EATON, Ira K.

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"Petie" (surveyor Frank Flournoy's car) arriving on Sea Wolf, 1923"
Eaton's Camp
Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island
Photo by Walter Collinge





EATON, Ira K. (1876-1938), Chicago-born on November 18, 1876, he came to Santa Barbara with his family in 1886 at age 9 where he remained, becoming a well-known resident for 53 years. His parents’ home was located at 322 East Victoria Street in Santa Barbara. Eaton completed the 8th grade, and went to work with his father in the carpentry business. In 1903 at 26 years of age, Eaton worked at the Union Mill and Lumber Company.

On September 2 Eaton married Margaret Holden whom he had met at a party six weeks earlier. Six months after their marriage, he decided to build a boat, declaring he could make more money fishing and sealing. Captain Colis Vasquez promised to teach Ira everything he knew. With many friends helping him, Eaton finished the Irene and launched her March 16, 1905. Thus Eaton began his seafaring career by bringing back Chinese fishermen from the islands, catching sea lions for Captain George McGuire, and chartering out for fishing trips. As business grew, Eaton catered to tourists in the summer months and fished the rest of the year.

In August 1906 for the rate of $10/month the Santa Cruz Island Company granted Ira Eaton “the sole right of camping on Santa Cruz Island for the purpose of fishing, etc. until April 30, 1907.” He was also given full authority to eject any other fishermen and prevent them from establishing themselves on the Island. In 1907, the Irene was lost at Valdez Harbor when her engine quit. Ira built the Sampan to replace her. In 1908, the Eatons moved to Santa Cruz Island where they first spent two weeks camped at Pelican Bay before they moved to the one-room cabin at Willows Anchorage built by the Nidever brothers in 1906 from lumber salvaged from the Colman. The Eatons stayed at Willows for the winter of 1908-1909, after which they moved to Dick’s Cove for the summer of 1909. Winter of 1909-1910 the Eatons lived on the east end of the island at Scorpion Anchorage in a tent with a wooden floor.

In 1910, they moved to Pelican Bay where they would stay for the next 27 years. In 1913, the Caires gave Ira Eaton exclusive rights to Pelican Bay. The following year Eaton built his well-known boat, Sea Wolf. Camp improvements were made, and the facility was expanded to accommodate eighty people or more at their popular resort. Film companies learned of the arrangements, which could be made for large crews, and dozens of silent films were produced on Santa Cruz Island. In 1916, Eaton bought the Gussie M from Captain McGuire for $1600.

From 1917 to 1927, in addition to running his Pelican Bay Resort, Eaton leased Anacapa Island from the government for two consecutive five-year lease periods to raise sheep. For his first lease he paid $607.50 per year. By November 11, 1918, however, Eaton reported he was going out of the sheep business on Anacapa because of the losses suffered from Austrian fishermen. Eaton was well known for his rum-running prowess, and during Prohibition he used Anacapa Island as a storage place for bootlegged liquor. His Anacapa Island lease fees were in part paid by the Larco brothers who placed fishermen on Anacapa Island. The island superintendent’s report of June 12, 1918 noted: “Eaton has gone into the fish business in competition with Larco and has found it advisable to carry a small quantity of meat.” By December 2, 1918 Eaton had “sold out his market to Larco and is some $5000 in debt as a result of his fish venture. Eaton must have turned his crawfish camps back over to Larco. At any rate, Larco is collecting the fish and the company is back where it was a year ago.”

January, 1919 Eaton was behind in his rent to the Santa Cruz Island Company. April 27, 1920 during Prohibition, Eaton was arrested for operation and possession of an “illicit distillery.” Helen Caire described Eaton as a “lean, shrewd Yankee, whose keen blue eyes swerved everywhere as he talked.”


May 2, 1920 [Bakersfield Morning Echo]: “Moonshiner school on San Nicolas Isle. Los Angeles, April 29.—A school for moonshiners is being conducted on San Nicolas Island, 75 miles off the coast of Los Angeles county, according to a statement declared to have been made by Ira Eaton, arrested on Santa Cruz Island, off Santa Barbara, Tuesday, charged with operating an illicit still.”


Ira Eaton died on August 13, 1938 at age 61 in Santa Barbara. He was survived by his ex-wife, Margaret (1876-1947), daughter Vera (1906-2004) [SS#546-24-5712], and two sisters, Mrs. Lillian Couch of Santa Barbara and Mrs. Mabel Long of Los Angeles. Ira Eaton’s ashes were scattered at sea off Santa Cruz Island by George Castagnola, and his nephew, Harold Couch. Eaton’s will, dated August 6, 1938, a week before his death, left to his daughter, “Vera N. Gibbons, the sum of $5 and no more.” The remainder of his estate was left to his “friend,” Catherine Miller.

The Eatons are buried in Santa Barbara Cemetery.



Eaton’s boats: »


In the News~

September 6, 1903 [LAH]: “Santa Barbara, Sept. 5. — On Wednesday evening the home of C. S. Eaton on Garden Street was the scene of a pretty wedding. The groom was Ira K. Eaton of this city and the bride was Miss Margaret H. Holden of British Columbia. The home was decorated with flower-woven fishnets, an elaborate work of the friends of the young couple. Rev. Warren D. More performed the ceremony at 8 o'clock in the evening. Miss Mabel Eaton was bridesmaid and Roscoe Eeley of Nebraska acted as best man. Miss Juanita Eaton, a pretty little girl of four years, carried the plate with the ring. a reception and supper, at which there were some thirty guests, followed the wedding. The young people are to reside in Santa Barbara.”


April 7, 1905 [SBMP]: “Diver tries to raise engines: Roswell Emmons locates wreckage of the sloop Pride, but fails to raise it... Mr. Emmons had a regular Clark diving suit sent down from San Francisco. It is a large affair made of metal and rubber and connected with air tubes and pumps, by which he is supplied with fresh air while working under the water. The entire outfit weighs about 850 pounds, the suit alone will weigh over 300 pounds. It was operated from Eaton's new power launch Irene...”


April 11, 1905 [SBMP]: “...Mr. Emmons has been preparing for several days to dive for the wrecks of the boats sunk in the last month’s storm. The arrangements were completed yesterday morning. He had a regular Clark diving suit sent down from San Francisco. It is a large affair made of metal and rubber and connected with air tubes and pumps, by which he is supplied with fresh air while working under water. The entire outfit weighs about 850 pounds, the suit alone will weigh over 300 pounds. It was operated from Eaton’s new power launch Irene...”


April 16, 1905 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton's Irene, Percy Bagley's Nautilus, and William Walker's Naiad, have formed a combination and are using every effort to solicit most of the excursion business for the home boats.”


April 16, 1905 [SBMP]: “Don Leach, Orrin Seeley, Ira Eaton, Percy Bagley, William Walker and other boat owners have combined their interests and will endeavor to give the public better boat service than they have in the past. Under this new combination a half dozen launches and sailboats will be placed in public service under a single management. A boat office and new gangway will soon be constructed on the railroad wharf, and a boatman will be on hand at all hours of the day to take orders from those who wish to take fishing or pleasure trips upon the water. They will charge a uniform rate.”


May 17, 1905 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton will leave with a pleasure party the latter part of the week for a cruise around Santa Cruz Island, going first to Valdez Harbor where a camp for the night will be pitched, and then proceeding on around the island, returning to the city on Sunday night.”


May 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “An excursion to the islands is being planned for Tuesday in Ira Eaton’s launch Irene. M. A. Tisdale at the Diehl Grocery is arranging the details and all desiring to go can communicate with him.”


June 16, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Peerless left for the islands yesterday with a party of pleasure seekers. Ira Eaton’s launch will leave today with a party.”


July 12, 1905 [SBMP]: “Captain Haron Rock of Montecito, Frank Knott of New York and Cameron Rogers enjoyed a pleasant fishing trip on the channel on Monday. They made the trip in Ira Eaton’s Irene. They brought back a large catch of fish and report fish to be biting very freely off Santa Cruz Island from Pelican Bay to Quava Valdez. In the middle of the channel they found albacore running and received many strikes, catching five large ones. A large whale and a swordfish were sighted on the trip.”


July 12, 1905 [SBMP]: “Henry Short, Ira Eaton, Basil Faulding, Edwin P. Bradbury, Jr. and Mrs. Reynolds left for San Miguel Island last night in the Irene. They were supplied with full camp equipment and will spend a week on the island.”


July 23, 1905 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton came in from the islands yesterday noon with a party of campers who have spent ten days on Santa Cruz Island, and reported having a very pleasant trip. They made the trip in the launch Irene. Mr. Eaton left last night with another party of fishermen for San Miguel Island, and will return in time to make a trip over to San Nicolas Island on Monday.”


August 2, 1905 [SBMP]: “An excursion to the islands was successfully carried out yesterday as a social entertainment by a party of prominent people at the Potter Hotel. The party consisted of John Keath of Bakersfield, Mrs. Dargie of Oakland, Dr, and Mrs. Craig of Phoenix, and Mr. and Mrs. Keathley of San Francisco. They made the trip to Santa Cruz Island in the power launch Irene, with Ira Eaton at the wheel...”


October 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “The launch Irene, in charge of Ira Eaton, sailed last night for San Nicolas Island after crawfish and other products of the ocean obtained on that island. She intended to make the trip a few days ago but repairs delayed the departure. She will bring back two of the fishermen who have been there for several weeks.”


November 3, 1905 [LAT]: “Many dead whales afloat in channel. The bodies of over twenty dead whales, known as ‘killers,’ are floating in the channel off San Nicolas Island, thirty miles from this city. The discovery was made by Walter Stafford, who has just returned from the islands in the launch Irene… Ira Eaton described such a conflict, which he passed a few weeks ago. The water of the channel was torn up so fiercely by the monsters, that he was afraid to approach nearer than a quarter of a mile to the scene of the battle...”


November 18, 1905 [SBMP]: “The power launch Irene returned yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island where she has been for several days working on the crawfish camps of Santa Cruz. Ira Eaton, who went over with the boat, remained on the island and will be busy for several days changing the location of the camps.”


November 21, 1905 [SBMP]: “The launch Irene returned from Santa Cruz Island on Sunday afternoon, and after unloading some crawfish caught at that island, left again for Anacapa Island. Ira Eaton returned from Santa Cruz with the boat. He reports that the channel was very rough, even before the strong wind of yesterday began.”


November 22, 1905 [SBMP]: “Yacht Vishnu will leave today in an endeavor to locate the missing boat Peerless... Captain Merry will sail today if the weather conditions will permit, in his power yacht, Vishnu, to the rescue of the boat and the men whom it is feared are stranded on the island. Captain Merry will be accompanied by Ira Eaton of the Irene, and by Horace Lawn...”


January 16, 1906 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton went over to Santa Cruz in his launch Irene in the afternoon.”


January 17, 1906 [SBMP]: Captain Merry and Ira Eaton sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning after crawfish that have been caught by Eaton fishermen off that island.”


March 8, 1906 [SBMP]: “Herbert Rogers secured four large sea lions that were captured off Santa Cruz Island by Captain Ira Eaton, and is preparing to ship them to eastern zoological gardens.”


March 21, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Irene, Captain Eaton's launch, was towed into port last night by the Vishnu. Having her engine disabled, she managed to reach Ventura under sail.”


April 5, 1906 [SBI]: “ The power launch Irene was brought back to port last night after having been given a general overhauling at San Pedro and being treated to a new coat of paint. She was in charge of Ira Eaton, who was accompanied by Frank Nidever and Gus Zukeweiler. The Irene is now in fine trim and will be a prominent factor in the channel pleasure business from this date on.”


April 29, 1906 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton will sail for the islands early this week, after a consignment of live seals. He has a large order to fill within a few days.”


May 9, 1906 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton has shipped fifteen live seals from this city to New York. With Frank Nidever, he caught them off Santa Cruz Island and brought them to this city in his launch Irene. They have been sent by express to zoological gardens in New York. Mr. Eaton has several other orders to fill and will endeavor to catch 16 more seals at once. He went over to the islands again yesterday afternoon.”


May 9, 1906 [SBI]: “Ira Eaton and Frank Nidever have again departed for the Channel Islands in search of seals and expect to be gone for several days. They left in the launch Irene. A shipment of fifteen seals has just been made to zoological gardens in New York City and there is a demand for more from the same source.”


May 13, 1906 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton of the sloop Irene is catching sea lions off Santa Cruz Island with Frank Nidever and a force of men. He has an order for sixteen live sea lions, which he hopes to fill this week. Boatmen returning from the island report that he had not caught any two days ago. He expects to return to this city on Tuesday.”


June 8, 1906 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton returned yesterday from a long pleasure cruise up the coast in his launch Irene. He was accompanied by Frank Nidever and Clarence Libbey. They started for Del Monte, but turned back after hugging the coast for a distance of 160 miles. They were eight days on the water and report having had a very pleasant trip.”


June 30, 1906 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton came in from the islands yesterday with a heavy cargo of sea lion skins. The skins were taken off San Miguel Island during the last three weeks. They will return at once for more.”


July 17, 1906 [SBMP]: “Five tons of abalone shell were unloaded at the wharf yesterday from the launch Irene. They were gathered by Ira Eaton and Frank Nidever at the islands. The abalone shells bring a good price in the open market.”


July 29, 1906 [SBMP]: “The launch Irene returned from San Miguel Island yesterday noon in charge of Ira Eaton. The Irene left last Thursday with Captain Waters, who went over to gather together a few hundred head of sheep for shipment in the schooner Santa Rosa Island to Port Los Angeles. The shipment will be made on Tuesday. The Irene left for Santa Cruz Island last night with a party of fishermen on a pleasure cruise.”


August 3, 1906 [SBMP]: “Seven hundred head of sheep were shipped from San Miguel Island in a schooner to San Pedro yesterday by Captain Waters, the captain accompanying the stock to that port. Ira Eaton returned to the city in the evening with his launch, bringing in a number of workmen who have been handling the sheep on the island.”


August 9, 1906 [SBI]: “Ira Eaton returned from Santa Cruz Island in the launch Irene, this morning, with five seals captured for H. A. Rogers. Eaton says they were obliged to lasso the animals on the rocks, and that he had an exciting time in landing them.”


August 12, 1906 [SBMP]: “A party of Santa Barbara men had a very pleasant trip to Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning as the guests of Alan Dunn, the associate editor of Sunset, and Julius Padilla, official photographer of Southern Pacific Railroad. They left at 2 o'clock in the morning in the launch Irene, in charge of Captain Eaton...”


September 21, 1906 [SBI]: “The launch Irene, Frank Nidever, captain, which has been in the harbor for the past two days, will leave this afternoon for Forney’s Cove, Santa Cruz Island. Captain Nidever on Tuesday brought eighteen sacks of crawfish from the fishers at the cove. He reports that the fishing is as good as in previous years, but that the market is not strong. The prices which the first shipment brought were a disappointment to Santa Barbara fishermen. Captain Nidever says the only way he can account for the low prices which are being received in the north is that the destruction of San Francisco has brought new conditions and lessened the demand. ‘There is a new class there, a kind that don’t eat lobsters or crawfish,’ he says. ‘The market in Los Angeles is no better.’ The Leone, a gasoline launch, and a crawfisher, with Captain Swanson in command, arrived in Santa Barbara this morning from San Pedro and will leave tonight or tomorrow for the island. Captain Nidever and his partner, Ira K. Eaton, are handling the catch of four crews. The Irene will return to Santa Barbara Sunday night in time for the northbound boat.”


January 4, 1907 [SBMP]: “Crawfish are plentiful. The Irene, in charge of Frank Nidever and Ira Eaton, has arrived from the Channel Islands with a big load of crawfish. The men report that since the heavy storms and the water has settled, the crawfish have come out of the deep water and the caves and are easily attracted to the trappers.”


January 6, 1907 [SBMP]: “The Peerless sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz and Anacapa islands, carrying a number of crawfish traps that have been manufactured since her arrival here a couple of days ago. These will be distributed along several island camps from which Captain Frank Nidever and Ira Eaton have been making so many large catches of crawfish during the past couple of weeks.”


January 17, 1907 [SBWP]: “Boat owners will rebuild. New fleet will be in water soon. Valuable engines saved from wrecks. Since the heavy southeaster that cast so many of the smaller craft onto the beach, the waterfront has been the scene of much activity… The Peerless, the Vishnu and the Irene are about the only boats left that are fit for service. The Irene, belonging to Nidever and Eaton, was at the islands during the storm and this probably saved her from the fate that befell the other small craft.”


June 23, 1907 [George E. Nidever to A. J. Caire, Santa Cruz Island Company]: “Dear Sir, I received your letter just now and in reply I say that I am no partner to Mr. Eaton and never was. I pay him to haul my fish to Santa Barbara and that is all we had to do with about the rent of the island. All I know is that Eaton told me that he rents the island for the crawfish season and that he was going to charge $5 to every camp, but if he ever got anything from anybody I don’t know. All I know is that I pay my share so that is all I can say. If you rent the houses [at Forney’s] I will pay as I told you in the other letter. I hope you are not going to charge too big rent. I will close hoping to hear from you soon. I remain your very truly, George E. Nidever, 102 E. Yanonoli Street, Santa Barbara, Cal.”


October 26, 1907 [SBMP]: “Ira Eaton arrived Thursday in the launch Irene from Forney's Cove, Santa Cruz Island, bringing 25 sacks of crawfish.”


December 11, 1907 [SBMP]: “Woman falls into sea in mid-channel. Heroic rescue of San Pedro resident by mate Charles Hansen of the schooner Baltic. Swept from the deck of a fishing schooner in a howling southeaster in mid-channel, a woman fought heavy seas until a heroic man from the same boat reached her and then, after a difficult and dangerous maneuvering, both were rescued by a boatman from another craft. This was the story brought here last night by Wesley Thompson of the launch Irene, just in from the islands... Captain Ira Eaton was also on board...”


August 22, 1908 [SBMP]: “The power launch Surprise, owned by Captain Ira Eaton, went to pieces on the rocks of San Miguel Island a few days ago. The boat was anchored off the island and broke away in a blow. Only the engine was saved.”


January 9, 1909 [SBMP]: “According to Captain Gilbert of the power schooner Baltic which arrived here from Santa Cruz Island, there has been considerable trouble among the crawfishermen of the islands for some days, and shooting scrapes have been reported. He brought over two wounded men, one with a bullet that entered his cheek and passed out the back of his neck, and the other, Julius Valdez, slipped on a rock, it was stated, and so hurt himself. The man with the bullet wound was attended by a local physician. ‘Valdez slipped and fell on a rock,’ said Captain Gilbert last night, ‘and when we arrived at his camp where he was in company with Frank Nidever and Ira Eaton, we had to take him aboard and bring him here for medical treatment.’ He is at his home...”


March 20, 1909 [SBI]: “Owing to the inability of Ira K. Eaton, the well known boatman, to meet payment on a promissory note for $129.15, which fell due several days ago, an attachment was levied on $139 worth of abalone shells and meat at the Stearn’s Wharf warehouse by Constable G. J. Fullington this morning. The attachment was levied in the name of Boeseke-Dawe Company, the well known hardware concern.”


Winter, 1909 [Eaton]: “Once again we started packing to move... this time to Scorpion at the east end of the island... Up to the right was a space of about 100 feet long and 25 feet wide. This was to be our camping place... Ira & Jenny [Eugenio Larco] built us a kitchen of driftwood…”


February 9, 1910 [SBI]: “Ira Eaton and Frank Trout, well-known local professional fishermen, narrowly escaped with their lives Sunday night, when Eaton’s launch, the Irene, was totally wrecked at the entrance to Valdez Harbor on Santa Cruz Island. At 10 o’clock Sunday night, Eaton and Trout left Valdez Harbor for a cruise up the coast of the island, when the gasoline engine stopped and the boat became unmanageable. The heavy surf caught that boat and tossed it on the rocks, wrecking it completely. Eaton and Trout escaped with a wetting and walked 15 miles to the nearest ranch house of the Santa Cruz Island Company. Destroyed with the boat was most of Eaton’s fishing equipment. He estimates his loss at $1600, uninsured. Eaton and Trout returned to the mainland yesterday afternoon in the Richard, owned by Joe Welner.”


July 26, 1910 [SBI]: “There have been many camping parties and cruises at Santa Cruz Island the last couple of weeks… F. A. Garbutt showed up with the Skidblandnir, which was conceded to be one of the classiest boats seen this summer in these waters. He brought about seventeen… Others were Captain Short with the Charm, Ira Eaton with the Surprise, and Dwight Faulding with the Mystery…”


September 22, 1910 [SBMP]: “A party of Montecito people, out yesterday with Ira Eaton for a fishing excursion on the channel, had very good luck, yellowtail running quite freely. One of the fishermen landed a 16-pound yellowtail with a 6 ounce rod after a battle lasting 46 minutes.”


October 5, 1910 [SBI]: “The launch Frances, which lay for several weeks on the sand at the end of the commercial wharf, and which for along time previous had been in the water in a sinking condition, was hauled today to the shop of Ira Eaton, where it will be repaired.”


March 30, 1913 [SBMP]: “Homesteading on Santa Cruz Island, partition may mean public’s chance. Captain Ira Eaton first on ground in case survey shows alleged excess of land. The possibility that there may be pubic land on Santa Cruz Island, as an excess of the original Spanish [Mexican] grant under which the Caire company holds the property, has been an interesting conjecture for many years, and in view of the litigation that has been commenced in San Francisco for a partition of the Justinian Caire estate, it is believed that there is a very lively possibility for a survey that will decide the point. If claims of outsiders are established, there will be found a tract of about 8000 acres of public land, to which the Caires have no valid claim. About two years ago, a party of five squatters went to Santa Cruz Island to homestead, in the expectation of making application for a government survey and thereby establishing their rights. Of this party, but one family, Captain and Mrs. Ira Eaton, having resided continuously on their prospective home site, notwithstanding regular notices from the Caires to vacate. Captain Eaton has two launches at the island, and makes a good living, fishing, coming quite frequently to the mainland.”


April 19, 1913 [SBMP]: “A shipment of six island seals started yesterday for London, being warded by Captain G. M. McGuire. Five more will be shipped within a few days to Hamburg, Germany. Captain Ira Eaton of the Gussie M brought a load of seals, numbering 21, from the island caves Thursday.”


May 19, 1913 [SBDN]: “Ira Eaton returned yesterday from a canvass of the Santa Cruz Island caves for seals for the veteran trader in this business, Captain McGuire. He was fortunate enough to bring home all he went after, six specimens.”


May 29, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton returned from the islands this morning in his power launch, Gussie M, bringing over three seals for Captain George M. McGuire. This boat has recently undergone a complete overhauling, and shows vast improvement over her former conditions. Captain Eaton is to take a hand at the island excursion business, for which he has put his craft in fine shape. To assist him in handling his boat he has secured the services of Captain James Palmer, who is reckoned one of the most able seamen on Pacific waters, he having, as master, satisfied every ocean known to navigation.”


June 2, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton gave a number of his friends, mostly members of the Flying A Company, a delightful treat yesterday afternoon, when he took them for a cruise on the bay in his power launch, the Gussie M. The party was out about three hours, and all on board enjoyed every minute of the time. The voyagers were greatly pleased with the fine sailing qualities of the staunch little craft, and the very comfortable quarters arranged through the recent overhauling and refitting given the vessel added greatly to the pleasure of the outing. The Flying A guests were: Misses Vivian Rich, Violet Neitz, ‘Billie’ West, Margaret Kernan; Mesdames Peter Morrison, Carl Morrison, Jean Durrell, Messrs. Wallace W. Kerrigan, Jack Van Cartmell, Chet Withey and Robert Grey. Others in the party were Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Leslie, Mr. Field, Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Cornell, Miss Nina Richdale, J. O. Eaton, E. C. Overman, Captain Hendricks and Jay Richdale.”


June 6, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton has returned from Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, where he went Monday morning on the Gussie M to complete arrangements for his summer camp. He was accompanied by Mrs. Eaton, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Stafford and E. C. Overman. The party had a delightful stay of three days and nights at the bay. Elaborate arrangements are being made by Mr. Eaton for the handling of the island traffic to Pelican Bay, and a large number of persons have already spoken for accommodations at the camp. This will consist of two frame buildings and several tents for campers. There will be excellent accommodations for such as desires to sleep entirely in the open. The camp is supplied with mountain spring water. Captain Ira Eaton now has two powerboats in commission, the Gussie M and the Sampan, and will soon have a third, the Frances, which is now being overhauled. Captain James Palmer, who came here from San Pedro, will assist in the transportation department. Captain Palmer has hauled many crafts all over the world. Aside from the camp, Captain Ira Eaton will be busy securing seals for Captain George M. McGuire. Eaton now has orders for many seals, including several of the monster Steller species, very difficult to capture and dangerous to approach. He will leave on a sealing cruise in a few days.”


June 13, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captains Henry Short and Ira Eaton, owners of the power launches Charm and Gussie M, respectively, have just concluded arrangements for a consolidation of their interests for the island excursion business during the summer and fall, and expect to do a lively business in carrying ocean pleasure seekers to the different island harbors… The first excursion under this arrangement will occur next Sunday, when both the boats named will go to Pelican Bay for a grand dedication of the new island camp.”


June 13, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captains Henry Short and Ira Eaton are about to establish a new camp at Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, for the summer months. Tents, meals and other necessities of camp life will be provided. Pleasure seekers will be conveyed to the island in the two launches, the Charm and the Gussie M. Captain Vasquez some time ago established a camp hotel at Fry’s Harbor, and has been taking parties over to the island regularly on the launch, Otter.”


June 16, 1913 [SBDN]: “The island camp at Pelican Bay recently established by Captains Short and Eaton was given a rousing opening yesterday by a party of something over fifty men, who went to the island in the Charm and Gussie M. A fine dinner was served, and the excursionists passed the day at fishing, mussel gathering, bathing and exploring the hills and canyons of this beautiful island resort.”


June 27, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton has made preparations for another Sunday excursion on the Gussie M to Pelican Bay next Sunday, the boat to leave the wharf at 1 o’clock A.M., thus arriving at the island at an hour that admits of along day at the resort. A sheep barbecue will be served, with fish chowder and mussels as added attractions to the picnic bill of fare.”


July 1, 1913 [SBMP]: “David Jacobs, the son of Edward Jacobs, 916 Spring Street, disappeared from the launch Gussie M on the return trip from Santa Cruz Island Sunday night and was drowned. As the launch approached the buoy, it was reported to Captain Ira Eaton that a man had fallen overboard. The launch was turned around and a search was made which did not have any results. There is still a bare possibility that Jacobs was not on the Gussie M. He made the trip over in the boat. To make certain, a launch was hurried back to the island to investigate. Fred Hassler is the only passenger who is positive Jacobs was aboard. The probabilities are that he was drowned, as several passengers declare they saw a man fall overboard, and he is the only person missing. Jacobs was about twenty years old and well known around town.”


July 2, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton took Earl Miller and the two Doulton boys to Pelican Bay yesterday in the Gussie M. They will establish a camp there where they will be joined by a number of people July 5.”


July 2, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton goes to Pelican Bay tomorrow morning in the Gussie M, taking over a lot of new tents and furniture to complete his camp for the summer season, for which a large patronage is already in sight.”


July 3, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton’s Gussie M will leave tonight for the islands with a party being organized by Fred Bebout. They will remain at Pelican Bay over the fourth.”


July 4, 1913 [OC]: “…Excursions to the islands are becoming so popular that local launch owners are having a hard time to accommodate the demand. Yesterday Captains Eaton and Short took over a party of about 40 in the two launches Gussie M, and Charm… A glass-bottom boat from which visitors may view the wonderful marine gardens at Santa Cruz Island will be installed this week and be operated by Short and Eaton…”


July 5, 1913 [SBDN]: Captain Eaton’s powerboat, the Gussie M, is kept on the move day and night, during these holiday times, in carrying passengers to and from the camp at Pelican Bay. There are two parties there now, numbering about fifty people in all, who will return to the mainland tomorrow, and another party will leave tomorrow morning. Eaton’s other powerboat, the Sampan, has been pressed into the passenger service for the rush season, filling out its time on the island shore in taking out fishing parties and carrying the patrons of the camp on little side trips for a view of the interesting points of coastline scenery.”


July 13, 1913 [SBMP]: “The Gussie M, Ira Eaton, sailed at 1 A.M. today for Pelican Bay, with a small party. The Otter, Captain Vasquez, will sail today for Fry’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, with a party of tourists.”


July 17, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from the islands last evening with a haul of six seals for Captain George M. McGuire. The seals will be shipped to Europe, to enter on a college training and they may at some future time return to Santa Barbara as the star performers in some ‘greatest show on earth.’”


July 18, 1913 [SBMP]: “A record catch has been made by Captain Ira Eaton, seal hunter for Captain George M. McGuire. Captain Eaton Started from Pelican Bay Tuesday afternoon with preparations to be gone several days in quest of an assortment of seals. In less than four hours the astonished campers on the island saw him return with a capture of nine fine specimens. This catch is undoubtedly the best ever made on these islands in the short space of time. Captain Eaton returned to this city last night with his catch and they will be shipped to Europe to be trained for circuses.”


July 26, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton returned from the islands in the Gussie M this morning and will take a crowd of passengers back to his camp at Pelican Bay tomorrow. The boat leaves the wharf at 1 o’clock A.M.”


July 26, 1913 [SBDN]: “The finest abalone pearl found at the islands for many a day was secured by Captain Ira Eaton while taking some abalones out of their shells yesterday, and he was proudly showing his find to his mainland friends today. It is of large size, showing excellent color and of exceptional good shape, being quite round, a shape rarely seen in pearls of this variety.”


August 29, 1913 [SBMP]: “Samuel C. Pinkham and E. P. Stevens returned yesterday with Captain Ira Eaton on the Gussie M from Pelican Bay, where they have been camping for ten days, enjoying the opportunity to view the marine gardens and explore the island forest, caves and canyons.”


September 2, 1913 [SBDN]: “Sea moss sacked and piled in a miniature mountain was brought from the islands this morning by Captain Ira Eaton. His staunch vessel was loaded to its capacity with the weed that is dear to the heart of the Mongolian. With the vessel and cargo came six Chinese, whose labors for weeks are represented by the sacks of moss. They were sent to the island by local and San Francisco interests to harvest the moss, now in a state of perfection. This is said to be one of the largest moss consignments ever brought to this port. When gathering moss one of the Celestials last week had an encounter with a wild boar, but managed to escape the creature’s sharp tusks by leaping into the ocean and swimming around a rock. The hogs relish the moss when dried, and had caused the Chinese no end of trouble by attempting to raid their drying camp. The trip from the island was made without incident. The arrival here was witnessed by a throng of local Chinese, who had gone to the wharf before daybreak in expectation of the return of the moss gatherers.”


September 13, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton will leave in a few days for San Francisco to place an order for a new powerboat to be used next season for the increasing island traffic. The craft will be 45 or 50 feet in length, and will have twin screws, in order that the time between Santa Barbara and the islands may be shortened. He expects to make a regular run from this city to Pelican Bay in one hour and fifty minutes. The boat will be the latest word in ship building, and will be larger than any vessel now in use for passenger business in this vicinity. Captain Eaton’s camp in Pelican Bay will break up this week, and Mrs. Eaton will return here Saturday for the winter. He looks for a great season next year, as a camping place is rapidly spreading up and down the coast. Yesterday he brought over three live seals for Captain George M. McGuire.”


September 19, 1913 [SBDN]: “Three live seals, barking vigorously as though protesting against being kidnapped, were brought from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon by Captain Ira Eaton in his powerboat, and delivered to Captain George M. McGuire to be sent east.”


October 24, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton arrived yesterday in his launch, Gussie M, from Santa Cruz Island with two seals for Captain George M. McGuire.”


October 29, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton put to sea in the Gussie M this morning, with two companions, bound to Santa Cruz Island after fish, and to indulge in hunting geese. The wild geese are beginning to arrive in great flocks on the island, flying south after having spent the summer in the wild haunts of the far north.”


December 5, 1913 [SBDN]: “Captain McGuire received four seals from the islands this morning by the Gussie M, Ira Eaton being in charge. They are selected specimens, and represent about the best catch made on Santa Cruz Island in a long time. One of the seals was so far tamed by the time it arrived here that the little animal seemed to like the attentions showed it, and permitted Captain McGuire to stroke its glossy coat without any sign of resisting the familiarity. The seals are to be shipped to professional trainers abroad.”


December 6, 1913 [SBMP]: “The Gussie M, Captain Ira K. Eaton, brought five live seals from Santa Cruz Island yesterday for Captain G. M. McGuire.”


December 13, 1913 [SBMP]: “The launch Gussie M, Captain Ira Eaton, arrived during the day from Pelican Bay, having had a comparatively smooth passage.”


December 16, 1913 [SBMP]: “Raymond Short dies suddenly. Popular high school boy, son of Captain H. S. Short, victim of pneumonia. The death of Raymond Wilson Short... comes as an unexpected blow to his family and to his many young friends… Captain Henry Short had been at the islands several days, not knowing how serious the boy’s condition had become. Only until a short time before the end, was it realized that he was in danger. The launch Gussie M, Captain Ira Eaton, started early yesterday morning to carry the sad intelligence to the bereaved father. At a late hour last night, neither the Gussie M nor the Charm had reached port...”


January 14, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton of the Gussie M returned from the Channel Islands this morning in the face of the driving wind. He reports that for two weeks, without an interruption, the wind has been blowing a gale on the islands, whipping the sea into rougher whitecaps than dreamed of along the mainland…”


January 14, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton at the helm of the Gussie M, put in here last night to explain to his friends that the tumors of his death were greatly exaggerated. ‘I did not intend to return until today, but I learned of the anxiety concerning me since the storm, so I pulled out for home. You would not dream there had been a storm over at the island. The water there has been as calm as a millpond. Captain Pepper’s boat has been anchored for a week right out in the open sea, and has not been disturbed by the storm conditions. The landward side of the island is as perfect a harbor as San Pedro, but fish are scarce. I believe that the storm has driven them out to sea’…”


February 11, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned yesterday from San Francisco with the news that he had placed an order for a new and speedy power yacht that will be placed in the channel service about May 1st. The boat will be 42 feet in length, and will have 30 horse-power standard engines. She is guaranteed to make eleven knots an hour, which will take her across the channel in two hours or less… Captain Eaton leaves today for San Pedro to get the Gussie M, which has been there for repairs, and will use her in the interim, and afterward as an auxiliary boat operating between Santa Barbara and the summer camps on the island.”


February 22, 1914 [SBMP]: “The launches Gussie M, Captain Ira Eaton, and the Otter, Captain Rosaline Vasquez, arrived from the islands yesterday, reporting quiet weather on the north side of the archipelago, the islands protecting the sea against the southeast blow. Bots boats brought several live seals, and Captain Eaton had several hundred pounds of crawfish.”


March 8, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton will take a fishing party out on the channel this morning in the Gussie M. If the water is favorable of the voyage, the party will go to Santa Cruz Island, and if not, there will be a cruise up and down the coast within a reasonable distance from the mainland.”


March 13, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton returned from Santa Cruz Island yesterday in the Gussie M, bringing home Harry Colman and Sol Gerow, who, with Eaton, formed a hunting party for wild hogs...”


March 15, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton is at Santa Cruz Island with the Gussie M, intent on the capture of eighteen young seals for Captain McGuire. The seals are to be shipped to eastern and European cities to be educated and trained for work in circuses and zoos.”


March 23, 1914 [SBDNI]: “L. D. Mosher of Mosher & Freeze, the auto supply firm, is spending his vacation with Captain Ira Eaton on Santa Cruz Island. He was seeking quiet and rest, but found neither. In fact, he is having a very strenuous time. Saturday he caught scores of rock cod, then came a succession of bites, and in the turmoil that followed he began to imagine he had hooked a whale. It wasn’t, but proved to be the biggest jewfish ever caught in these waters. A block and tackle were required to haul the fish aboard the launch, and when it was weighed it was found to tip the scales at 225 pounds. He brought the fish to the city yesterday, and then returned to the island, where he is now hunting wild boars.”


March 31, 1914 [SBMP]: “At 5 o’clock A.M. yesterday Captain Ira K. Eaton started in the Gussie M for San Miguel Island to take over a force of Captain Water’s sheep shearers. When the sturdy little boat had got about eight miles from shore, however, the water had become so rough, and with the prospects all in favor of worse conditions, that the captain thought it better to give up the journey for that day, so he turned around and pulled out for the mainland. Unless the wind and the tide conditions should again be unfavorable, the party will be taken to the island today.”


April 1, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left for San Francisco last night to supervise the finishing of his new boat, the Sea Wolf, now in process of construction on the upper bay. The captain expects his new craft to be finished about April 25th, and within a day or two of its completion he will sail her to the home port. His wife and daughter and half a dozen of his intimate friends will go to San Francisco for the sole purpose of sailing on the Sea Wolf on her maiden voyage to this city. The new boat is rated by its owner and master A-1 in its class, and very creditable performances are expected of her by those who are informed as to her lines, specifications and equipment.”


April 1, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton of the Gussie M left last night for San Francisco intending to return by April 25 with his new power launch, the Sea Wolf, which is rapidly nearing completion there. He will be joined later in the month by Mrs. Eaton and a party of friends, who will make the maiden trip south with the new vessel. Captain Albert Chase is now in charge of the Gussie M, having taken over Captain Eaton’s license.”


April 19, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came from Santa Cruz Island in his powerboat yesterday morning, the Gussie M, with 28 live seals for Captain McGuire. This is declared by the latter, who is certainly good authority in the subject, to be the largest capture of seals ever made from the island waters…”


April 20, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with twenty-eight seals for Captain McGuire, who will ship them to the east to a trainer.”


May 12, 1914 [SBMP]:Sea Wolf is now ready for the waves. Ira Eaton’s new craft will be launched tomorrow at Sausalito… A day or so will be devoted to trying out the engine on the waters of San Francisco Bay… Captain Ira Eaton expresses himself delighted with his new craft. She is a handsome model…”


May 12, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton’s new boat, Sea Wolf, is expected to be launched at Sausalito tomorrow. After a trial trip about the bay, Captain Eaton will head for Santa Barbara with the boat which is to figure in the summer passenger traffic between here and Santa Cruz Island.”


May 22, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton may arrive here late this evening or early tomorrow from San Francisco in his new launch Sea Wolf. According to friends he left San Francisco in his new boat for the south yesterday. Several test runs in the bay have shown the machinery of the speedy craft to be running smoothly, and it is rather expected that he will take the southern trip leisurely, and not attempt any speed, in which case he would not reach Santa Barbara until sometime Saturday. The boat is described as one of the neatest launches afloat, and capable of making a new record in the run between this city and the islands.”


June 2, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from the islands yesterday in his launch Sea Wolf, with a lot of seals for Captain George M. McGuire. The seals were caught on San Miguel Island.”


June 9, 1914 [SBMP]: “Last Sunday Captain Ira K. Eaton took a small party of invited guests on a delightful cruise up the coast on his beautiful new powerboat, the Sea Wolf… The cruise ended with a rousing vote of thanks to Captain Eaton for his courtesy to those who made up the passenger list on the maiden trip of the Sea Wolf…”


June 19, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton is at the islands in his boat, the Sea Wolf, after seals for Captain McGuire, the order being for eight. On this trip, Captain Eaton took over five lots of equipment and supplies for his camp at Pelican Bay.”


June 20, 1914 [SBMP]: “The Sea Wolf will take a large party to Pelican Bay tonight, and another tomorrow morning. It will keep Captain Eaton and his fine boat on the jump to handle the two crowds over Sunday, but he has done the same thing many a time before, and is now better equipped than ever for that sort of business.”


June 20, 1914 [SBMP]: “Eaton captures two more Stellers. Captain of the Sea Wolf bitten by enraged animal when landed. There is another feather in the cap of Captain Ira Eaton in the capture of Steller sea lions—so very rare, and so extremely difficult to take alive. Eaton came in from the islands in his powerboat Sea Wolf, yesterday morning with six California sea lions and two Steller sea lions, for George McGuire…”


July 27, 1914 [SBDNI]: “One hundred and twenty Santa Barbara people left for the islands at 8 o’clock this morning aboard the steamer Eureka. The great majority of the passengers were women. The boat will return here about 6 o’clock this evening, thus giving the party four hours at the islands for fishing and side excursions to the Painted Cave and other interesting places. Captain Eaton also left this morning in the Sea Wolf and accompanied the big boat over. Lunch will be served for the party at Eaton’s camp.”


June 30, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton goers to Pelican Bay with his powerboat, Sea Wolf, this morning, to take over lumber for a dancing floor at that resort. The floor will be twenty-two feet square, and it will be greatly appreciated by the island campers and visitors who went to dance to the added music of the ocean waves.”


July 1, 1914 [SBDNI]: “4th of July Sea Wolf excursions. 8-mile trip on the channel around the buoy and back Saturday, July 4th. Leaves wharf at 1:00 P.M. and every hour thereafter. Fare 25¢. Sunday island excursion leaves Stearn’s Wharf for Pelican Bay 8:00 A.M., Sunday, July 5. Returning 6:00 P.M. A glorious trip across the dancing channel. Round trip fare $2.00. Special island excursion leaves wharf Friday, July 3 at 7:00 P.M. returning Sunday evening, July 5. A splendid two days’ outing, round trip fare. $2.00. Tickets on sale at Mosher & Freeze store, 722 State St., or at the boat at wharf. Captain Ira K. Eaton, owner.”


July 4, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Pelican Bay in his powerboat, Sea Wolf, at noon yesterday, to add his handsome craft to the marine pageant that is expected to be such an important feature this evening, in the big celebration. Mrs. Eaton and her daughter, Vera, returned with the Captain for the Fourth of July festivities.”


July 4, 1914 [SBMP]: “The building formerly occupied by the La Petite Theatre will be thrown open today for a place of general amusement. There will be many attractions, but the most conspicuous will be the seven huge sea lions captured recently by Captain Ira Eaton in the rookeries of the Channel Islands…”


July 9, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton is at the island with the Sea Wolf, hunting seals for Captain George McGuire. The boat is scheduled for an excursion voyage to Pelican Bay on Wednesday of each week, but she was not in port yesterday, and it is supposed the omission was caused by Eaton’s delay insuring the big game of the deep that he went out to seek.”


July 9, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Mr. and Mrs. George W. Downing with Mr. and Mrs. John Grocott leave with their families next Sunday for a 10-days outing on Santa Cruz Island. They make the trip to Pelican Bay on the Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton’s new power launch. Lieutenant Downing will take his famed dogs along for the trip.”

July 9, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Mr. and Mrs. George W. Downing with Mr. and Mrs. John Grocott leave with their families next Sunday for a 10-days outing on Santa Cruz Island. They make the trip to Pelican Bay on the Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton’s new power launch. Lieutenant Downing will take his famed dogs along for the trip.”


July 11, 1914 [SBMP]: “Tonight Ira Eaton will take a party of twenty-eight to Pelican Bay in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, to camp for a week, and tomorrow morning he will take about as many for a two week stay in camp at the same popular resort.”


July 13, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton’s new pleasure launch, left this morning with a party of three for Eaton’s camp at Pelican Bay.”


July 19, 1914 [SBMP]: “Today the Sea Wolf will take an excursion party on a usual island trip. Generally the destination is one of the harbors on the north side of the island, and there are comparatively very few of the island invaders from Santa Barbara who know anything about the south side of the most beautiful of all the islands along the California shore of the Pacific. Today’s party will start at 7 o’clock from Stearn’s Wharf for a trip clear around the island, stopping at Willow Harbor on the south side, for dinner. The party will number about 25, and Captain Eaton promises the excursionists an enjoyable day.”


July 21, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Yesterday 130 Venturans visited the islands aboard the steamer Eureka and were cared for at Captain Eaton’s camp. Next Monday the Eureka will take a larger party from this city to the same camp…”


July 22, 1914 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning Captain Ira Eaton returned from Pelican Bay on the Sea Wolf. He reported a very successful and enjoyable excursion from Ventura the preceding day, the party numbering 125 and making the stop for dinner at Pelican Bay. The voyagers came up from Ventura by the steamer Eureka and the Sea Wolf, which later craft went down to that city last Sunday night to take overflow from the Eureka whose passenger limit is 100.”


July 23, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Mr. and Mrs. G. Kimberley and their two children left this morning aboard the Sea Wolf with Captain Eaton for a two weeks’ vacation on the islands. Sea Wolf also carried a large cargo of provisions for the numerous campers at Captain Eaton’s resort.”


July 24, 1914 [SBMP]: “Steamer Eureka to make voyage across channel Monday. Increasing interest is manifested in the big excursion to Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island by the steamer Eureka next Monday, and it looks as though the accommodations of the steamer will be apt to be sold out before the day set for the event… The steamer will land at Pelican Bay, one of the best harbors on the island shore, and four hours will be spent at Eaton’s camp and roundabout. A fine fish dinner will be served here, or passengers may take their dinner with them…”


July 25, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The present booking shows that the steamer Eureka will carry more than fifty Santa Barbara people to the islands Monday morning. At the islands Captain Eaton is making special preparations to care for his guests, and side trips to the Painted Cave and other points of interest have been arranged. The Eureka will have been arranged. The Eureka will sail at 8 o’clock Monday morning.”


July 30, 1914 [SBDNI]: “A party of young people is planning a trip to Painted Cave and Pelican Bay on Sunday. They will leave early in the morning with Captain Eaton in the Sea Wolf and will return Sunday evening… Four of the young men in the party form a quartet, and the music will be a feature of the trip…”


August 1, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton’s powerboat, the Sea Wolf, is chartered for tomorrow by a party of thirty people who will spend five or six hours in the enjoyment of the beauties of Pelican Bay.”


August 2, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton went to Ventura yesterday and arranged to take thirty people on the Sea Wolf from that city to Pelican Bay tomorrow, these being the excess of the number going by the full complements of 100 passengers from Ventura to the same island resort.”


August 3, 1914 [SBMP]: “Reduce expense of island excursion. Eureka trip, including incidentals to be 50 cents cheaper. E. J. Gourley and Harry Smith, who have ran a couple of excursions to the island by the steamer Eureka, and with decided success, are planning to continue the business along better lines than before. Heretofore the fare for the round trip by steamer has been $2, the price of the big fish dinner at Pelican Bay 50 cents, and the fare on the side trip 50 cents, making a total charge of $3 for the days outing for those who enjoyed all these features… By an arrangement just concluded with Captain Eaton, who manages the camp at Pelican Bay, and owns, besides the Sea Wolf, two other powerboats and several skiffs and a glass-bottom boat, at the popular island resort names, an excursion rate of $2.50 to cover all items enumerated... Dinner will be served about noon, after which the visitors will be taken to the Painted Cave… It is expected that the next excursion from here will be run next Monday, and the chances are that the only way to secure accommodations for this delightful trip will be to make early application.”


August 7, 1914 [SBDNI]: “H. A. Smith, who is managing the island excursion aboard Eureka, which leaves here at 8 o’clock Monday morning, says that fish stories are turning Monday’s party into one big fishing trip. The Eureka will stay four hours at the islands, and Captain Eaton, who is keeping daily track of the best fishing grounds, will be ready when the boat arrives to take the fishermen out in the Sea Wolf… Many of those who go to the islands next Monday will be members of the last excursion party.”


August 8, 1914 [SBMP]: “…The Eureka will leave Stearn’s Wharf on this excursion at 8 o’clock and sail directly to Pelican Bay, arriving there in time for a good view of the beauties of that harbor before serving of a fish and chowder dinner at Eaton’s camp…”


August 8, 1914 [SBMP]: “The powerboat Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton, came in from the islands yesterday morning and will return to Pelican Bay today, so that the captain can receive the members of the South Coast Yacht Club…”


August 9, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned in the Sea Wolf from Pelican Bay yesterday afternoon bringing back a party he had taken over the preceding day… Yesterday Captain Eaton caught a yellow-fin tuna weighing 48 pounds…”


August 12, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton has taken the Sea Wolf to San Pedro to be overhauled and repainted. He will return to the bay next Friday night.”


August 14, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The Stanford students camping party at the islands, is making records in all the island sports and pleasures, according to the reports from Captain Ira K. Eaton’s camp. They are making big catches of fish and enjoying big fish dinners. The boys are expert swimmers and vary that sport with mountain climbing. They will remain on the island for two weeks more. In the party are: M. A. Cadwallader, J. T. Pugh, D. S. Ross, H. R. Hertel, E. E. Kern, E. B. Hall, T. H. Workman, H. W. Dawson, A. Hagerman, A. J. Shafer, A. Barbour, R. McAdam, C. Jacomini, T. Harrigan, A. H. McEwen, H. J. Cooper, H. J. Becker, Howard Wright.”


August 15, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who has been at San Pedro with his boat, the Sea Wolf, is in Ventura today, and will sail from there with a party tomorrow for his camp on Santa Cruz Island. He is expected to come here with the Sea Wolf next Tuesday.”


August 16, 1914 [SBMP]: “Tomorrow the steamer Eureka will take another excursion party from Ventura to Pelican Bay. The visitors will have their dinner at Captain Eaton’s camp and return to their homes in the evening.”


August 17, 1914 [SBMP]: “Yesterday Ira Eaton went to Ventura in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, to take a party of excursionists to his camp at Pelican Bay. These will be thirty people who had applied for passage aboard the steamer Eureka to the same island harbor today, but who could not be accommodated on account of the Eureka’s passenger limit. The party, numbering 130 people in all, will have dinner at the bay and return to Ventura this evening.”


August 19, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who returned this morning in the Sea Wolf with his wife and daughter to their island resort, expects to be back tomorrow afternoon with five seals for Captain George M. McGuire. The Sea Wolf has been chartered by Ventura parties for the greater part of the next three weeks. The launch Miramar will take the place of the Sea Wolf during that period. Many night parties are being made up in Ventura for boat rides on the phosphorus, which is now more brilliant than ever before, according to Captain Eaton. The phosphorus seems to be drifting north, and may be in Santa Barbara in a few days. Fishermen are now busy catching albacore south of Anacapa Island. The fish are traveling north and the boats may be landing at Santa Barbara in a week or two. They are now landing at San Pedro. There was a big dancing party at Eaton’s camp last Friday. One of Captain Eaton’s guests killed three wild hogs, which Mrs. Eaton roasted whole and dressed with greens for guests from every portion of the islands, the visiting yachts and private parties.”


August 19, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain and Mrs. Eaton returned here yesterday from their island camp for a short visit in the city. They brought with them fifteen Stanford boys who have been guests in their camp for the last two weeks.”


August 20, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton left for Pelican Bay in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, yesterday morning, with several passengers who will stay at his island resort for several days, and with an order from Captain George McGuire for eight seals that are wanted for eastern zoos. The search for the seals will be made in the caves of San Miguel Island.”


August 23, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came in from San Miguel Island yesterday morning with four seals to fill an order that Captain George McGuire has from an eastern zoo. After he delivered his catch, Eaton left with his boat for Ventura, where he has a charter that will keep him for several days at the command of a party of veterans who will go to Pelican Bay to enjoy camp life on the island.”


August 24, 1914 [LAT/SB]: “…This morning Captain Ira Eaton returned from the seal rookeries on Santa Cruz Island with four splendid specimens of seals which Captain McGuire will send to Washington, New York and Cincinnati.”


August 24, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain George M. McGuire now has four seals ready for shipment to an eastern zoo. The seals were brought here Saturday from the islands by Captain Ira Eaton in the Sea Wolf. Captain Eaton is expected to be here again this evening.”


August 25, 1914 [SBMP]:Sea Wolf returns. Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Pelican Bay yesterday, bringing back from the island several campers who have been reveling in the charms of that beautiful region…”


August 28, 1914 [OC]: “The Sea Wolf, Captain Eaton’s boat, will carry an excursion from Hueneme to Santa Cruz Island next Sunday. The start will be made at 8 o’clock. The boat will stop at Santa Cruz for dinner. The trip around the island will include all the interesting spots, including Pelican Bay. Reservations for the trip can be made now at the Courier office. Tickets for the trip, including dinner, are $2.”


September 14, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Eaton, who is now in San Pedro with his boat, the Sea Wolf, is expected to return Wednesday or Thursday.”


September 15, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Nine seals wanted for eastern zoos are still enjoying liberty because Captain Ira K. Eaton cannot reach their lairs, as the water is too rough around the islands where they live.”


September 19, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, with his launch the Sea Wolf, visited Santa Barbara yesterday, and returned to the island.”


September 29, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton is again at the islands intent on getting the seals which Captain G. M. McGuire ordered five weeks ago, and which continuous rough weather has made them impossible to get. Captain Eaton said when he left here he believed the weather was now calm enough for seal catching.”


October 6, 1914 [SBDNI]: “After doing a lively business through the summer, the Sea Wolf has been converted into a fishing boat. Captain Ira K. Eaton, the craft’s owner, will operate the boat.”


October 7, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton arrived from the islands this afternoon in his boat, the Sea Wolf, with eight seals for Captain G. M. McGuire and 200 pounds of smelt.”


October 14, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, in his launch Sea Wolf, has started after six more seals for Captain George M. McGuire. Many orders from the east for seals have been received by Captain McGuire, who has a busy winter before him in his seal business.”


November 6, 1914 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira Eaton will take Captain Waters to San Miguel Island and from there he will proceed to Pismo Beach to get a party who will go out fishing for four days, after which Sea Wolf will return to San Miguel Island to bring Captain Waters back to the mainland.”


November 11, 1910 [SBDNI]: “Ira Eaton, of the launch Sea Wolf, is said to have been stopped by a German cruiser, while going from Santa Cruz Island to San Pedro. He says the war boat bought from him 900 pounds of smelt at a good price. Eaton reported the affair at San Pedro, where Captain Charles Davis, formerly humane officer here, is now located. Davis has a sea elephant on exhibition at Venice.”


December 25, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton came in from the islands yesterday with his staunch little powerboat, the Sea Wolf, bringing thirteen seals that he had captured at China Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, an order from Captain George McGuire. This ends Captain Eaton’s sealing operations this year…”


January 3, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left last night for San Miguel Island in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, to try to locate some new fishing banks.”


January 4, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A hunt quite out of the ordinary is being conducted today by Captain Ira K. Eton of the Sea Wolf. The captain is searching for new fishing banks in the vicinity of San Miguel Island.”


January 6, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A pup seal, only six months old, and so good-natured that he wants to be petted like a dog, is the unusual animal pet which Captain George M. McGuire possesses. The little seal, which was included in the capture of a dozen made two weeks ago by Captain Ira K. Eaton for Mr. McGuire, is as tractable and jolly as the newly-caught seal is savage. Captain McGuire has named his pet ‘El Capitan.’”


January 8, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left last night for San Miguel Island in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf. He is after fish, and hopes for better luck than has been found in the island waters by any of the fishermen.”


January 8, 1915 [SBMP]: “The schooner Comet, which went on the rocks of rugged San Miguel Island four years ago and had a rest there ever since, with her hull intact and most of her cargo still on her deck and in her hold because it could not be landed through the raging surf that almost continually assails the shore of the little-visited island, went to pieces in a might ground swell that came to those waters last Friday. This information was brought to the mainland yesterday morning by Captain Ira K. Eaton, who returned from the island armed with a small load of fish. He said the people who have lived for years on the island declared that they had never seen such a violent ground swell there—and there are stronger ones there regularly than almost anywhere else on the coast. The Captain said that the Comet’s hull was simply shattered in splinters, and that the sea for a long distance roundabout was strewn with the wreckage.”


January 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain George M. McGuire has at his seal house on the fisherman's wharf, what he calls a phenomenon in seals. It is a pup from the last lot of seals caught by Captain Ira K. Eaton for Captain McGuire and brought to the mainland about ten days ago...”


January 19, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Bringing in a ton and a half of fish, mostly rock cod and whitefish, Captain Ira K. Eaton’s powerboat, the Sea Wolf, came into port this morning with catches from the fishermen on Santa Rosa Island. This is considered a fair catch, according to the Larco Fish Company, which reported this morning, however, that fish still continue scarce, and that they are quite expert in keeping away from the fishing boats.”


January 21, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton’s powerboat, the Sea Wolf, leaves this morning for Santa Rosa Island waters after fish.”


January 21, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Her destination Santa Rosa Island, the powerboat Sea Wolf, Captain Ira K. Eaton, left this morning for the waters in the island’s vicinity, to bring back a cargo of fish caught there by the fishing fleet.”


February 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came in from Santa Cruz Island with his powerboat Sea Wolf yesterday morning, bringing a load of rock cod. The boat will return to the islands today.”


February 24, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left for San Miguel Island in the Sea Wolf last evening. He will return tomorrow, bringing to the mainland Mrs. Russell, wife of the superintendent of the island, who will visit her daughter, Mrs. Clarence Libbey, for some time, the latter’s husband being confined to his home by sickness.”


February 24, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Rather than sell fish at a loss, local professional fishermen are planning to organize a cooperative fish drying plant, by which they hope to dispose of their surplus catches whenever the market is overstocked and prices are down to a figure too low to sell fish at any profit. Captain Ira K. Eaton is the originator of the project, and plans to establish a fish-drying factory at his camp in Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, the center of the fishing industry around the islands. Mr. Eaton has secured an old Maine fisherman who is an expert at drying fish, and the plant’s output will be sold at San Pedro, and in the Los Angeles markets.”


March 4, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday Captain Ira K. Eaton returned to Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf, taking a company of motion picture actors bent on capturing some of the incomparable scenery of the island for a photoplay.”


March 4, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A party of motion picture players is at Santa Cruz Island today, using the incomparable scenery as settings for a photoplay. The actors and actresses were taken over yesterday by Captain Ira K. Eaton in his launch, the Sea Wolf.”


March 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “Actors return to island. Captain Ira K. Eaton went to Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning, taking back there a company of Santa Barbara actors who he had brought back from the island the evening before, after a day spent there to work on a photoplay.”


March 6, 1915 [SBMP]: “Island scenery wins praise from actors. Director L. B. Carleton, of the Alhambra Motion Pictures DeLuxe at the Santa Barbara studios, has just returned from a trip to Santa Cruz Island with his entire company, after many exciting experiences within the past three days that read like a chapter from one of Jules Verne’s novels. For the past ten days, Mr. Carleton has been working on a two-part drama entitled Heart of my Heart. It was necessary to have a series of scenes representing a smuggler’s cave and surroundings. Santa Cruz Island was selected as the right spot. The company left here Wednesday morning aboard the Sea Wolf, Captain Eaton commanding. It was a merry party, for the entire journey was new to all of them. Betty Harte, the leading lady, Edward J. Pell, leading man, Richard Morris, Etta Raynor, O. H. Illmer and George Knight together with camera man Kull have but recently come to Santa Barbara from the east, and of course the trip was looked forward to with great delight. Ask anyone of them today what they think of the water trip and outside of saying it was beautiful as far as the scenery was concerned, they will one and all say—‘never again.’ A storm came up on the trip to the island and Mr. Illmer was washed off the deck of the motorboat, and it took the efforts of the entire company and crew to get him aboard again.”


March 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Picture players have experience on Channel Island. Betty Harte gets enough material for a book on Santa Cruz. Director L. B. Carleton of the Alhambra Motion Pictures DeLuxe at the Santa Barbara studios has just returned from a trip to Santa Cruz Island with his entire company after many exciting experiences within the past three days that read like a chapter from one of Jules Verne’s novels. For the past ten days Mr. Carleton has been working on a two part drama entitled Heart of My Heart. It was necessary to have a series of scenes representing a smuggler’s cave and surroundings. Santa Cruz Island was selected as the right spot. The company left here Wednesday morning aboard the Sea Wolf, Captain Eaton commanding…”


March 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “Eaton after seals. Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Santa Cruz Island Sunday noon after seals for Captain George M. McGuire. Eaton is expected to take on Scotty Cunningham and Charles Larson at Pelican Bay to aid him in his expedition.”


March 10, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton is scouring the caves of Santa Cruz Island for seals for Captain George M. McGuire, and hopes to be back within two or three days with ten specimens for which the latter has orders from eastern zooS and circuses.”


March 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island in his powerboat Sea Wolf, in which, accompanied by Scotty Cunningham, he had been hunting seals in the island caves. The hunters brought home one seal, they having found very unfavorable conditions of water in caves. A heavy ground swell had torn their nets badly and they had to postpone their quest until a better state of water came. They will resume the hunt today.”


March 14, 1915 [SBMP]: “After Irish Moss. Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Forney's Cove, Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with a crew of Chinamen who will make camp there for the purpose of gathering Irish moss, which they will export to China, where this sea product is regarded a great food delicacy.”


March 17, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came in from Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning with a prize cargo of 16 California seals for Captain George McGuire...”


March 17, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Of 16 seals captures at Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands by Captain Ira K. Eaton for George M. McGuire, three have been shipped to San Francisco for exhibition at the fair, six are going to London for the Regent’s Park Zoo, and the remainder will go east to become trained vaudeville and circus performers.”


March 19, 1915 [SBMP]: “To Pelican Bay. Yesterday morning Captain Ira K. Eaton went to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf to take over a party of fishermen who will make camp there to engage in fishing operations. Eaton will return to the mainland today, and it is probable that he will leave tomorrow on another seal hunting expedition for Captain George M. McGuire, who has just received a new order for these queer denizens of the deep.”


March 24, 1915 [SBMP]: “Herman Norden of Paris, France and a half dozen other guests of the Potter Hotel went to Santa Cruz Island last Monday on Captain Ira K. Eaton's power schooner, the Sea Wolf...”


March 24, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A party of Potter’s guests have just returned from a trip to Santa Cruz Island, taken over to observe the scenic beauties of that locality. The trip was made in Captain Ira K. Eaton's boat Sea Wolf, and everyone going was enthusiastic over the delightful trip.”


March 24, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton is repainting his jaunty little powerboat, Sea Wolf, to get her ready for the island excursion business. The season will open next Sunday, for which day the boat is chartered for a trip to the islands. Captain Eaton may arrange for two or three regular trips to the island weekly, devoting the other week days and Sundays to charters by private parties.”


March 24, 1915 [SBDNI]: “In preparation for the summer vacation season, Captain Ira K. Eaton is repainting and overhauling the Sea Wolf. The boat will be placed in commission next Sunday, a party having chartered the vessel for a cruise to Santa Cruz Island that day. Captain Eaton is planning several weekly trips to the islands, carrying excursionists and sightseers.”


March 30, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned yesterday from Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, where he had taken E. P. Stevens and another man who will camp at the bay for a week of fishing and enjoyment of the other attractions of this famous island resort.”


March 30, 1915 [SBDNI]: “It is sheep shearing time in San Miguel Island, and for the purpose of getting ready for the annual ‘hair cut,’ which is given the several thousand sheep on the island by their owners, the Waters brothers, a gang of a dozen or more men will leave here tomorrow in Captain Ira K. Eaton’s boat Sea Wolf… Captain Eaton’s boat makes the trip in four hours and a half. The captain will return tomorrow night. He said today the Sea Wolf has been chartered by parties for every day this week, and that indications are this summer’s business will be record-breaking.”


April 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “The Sea Wolf went to Naples yesterday to get the catch of a number of fishermen operating in the upper channel waters. Captain Eaton expects to return today, and to leave for San Miguel Island tomorrow morning with Captain Waters, who goes to look after his sheep shearing operation there.”


April 9, 1915 [SBDNI]: “That the pleasures of the channel waters and the beauties and wonders of the islands should be employed more systematically for the benefit of Santa Barbara is the opinion of those who made the trip to the islands Wednesday… aboard Captain Eaton’s boat Sea Wolf. They skirted the coast of the island, visited the big cave and had lunch at Valdez Harbor. The other beauty spots visited were Painted Cave, the Ruby Rock, La Canada, Cueva Valdez, Arch Rock, Ladies Harbor, Dick’s Harbor, Mussel Rocks, the Orizaba, Twin Harbors and Pelican Bay. The party climbed the mountains back of Pelican Bay and gathered many wild flowers there…”


April 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “About 20 members of The Hikers went to Santa Cruz Island last night on Captain Eaton's boat, the Sea Wolf, to spend a long Sunday exploring the beauties of Pelican Bay and other picturesque parts of the island.”


April 12, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Captain Eaton returned yesterday afternoon in his boat, the Sea Wolf, with 18 members of the Hikers Club, who had taken advantage of a vacant date in their schedule of land tours to try the sea. The party left Saturday evening and spent the night at Pelican Bay. The next day they toured the island coast in row boats, and took a hike back into the island mountains…”


April 13, 1915 [SBMP]: “An island party made up mostly of members of the Hikers Club, went to Pelican Bay in Captain Eaton's boat, the Sea Wolf, last Saturday night...”


April 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton went to Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning with a small party of Montecito people who were out for a three day fishing cruise. They will return tomorrow evening, and Sunday morning the Sea Wolf will carry a party of excursionists to Valdez Harbor for a day at that charming island resort.”


April 16, 1915 [SBDBI]: “A party of Montecito society men is enjoying a fishing cruise around Santa Cruz Island today in Captain Ira K. Eaton’s sturdy power launch Sea Wolf. The fishermen will return tomorrow. Sunday the captain will carry a party of excursionists to Valdez Harbor to pass the day at this picturesque island camp.”


April 17, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Going over on what was intended merely as a three day fishing trip, a group of Montecito and Santa Barbara millionaires became so enthusiastic over Santa Cruz Island, that they have picked out a camp site at Pelican Bay, and will establish a camp there this summer, instead of going thousands of miles to find a less satisfactory vacation resort. Those making the trip were F. W. Leadbetter, of this city and Seattle; W. H. Bartlett, of Middle Road, Montecito; Mr. Munn, and Mr. Tripp, also of Montecito. The party returned last night after passing three days cruising around the island, personally conducted by Captain Ira K. Eaton in his power launch Sea Wolf. After visiting two or three places on the island, the beauty and restfulness of the isle so delighted the visitors, that on reaching Pelican Bay they told Captain Eaton they would look no further, but would make camp there this summer, instead of going away to the far places of the earth to seek rest and outdoor recreation. Incidentally, the combined wealth of the four men runs into seven figures, and two of them, Mr. Leadbetter and Mr. Bartlett, own half of the stock in the Hot Springs Club. Captain Eaton and his helpers were given $10 tips at the trip’s conclusion, in addition to being well-paid for their services.”


April 30, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf last evening, bringing over 1000 pounds of fish. Tomorrow evening he will take a party of Flying A hunters over to Santa Rosa Island for a boar hunt. The wild hogs are plenty on this island, and these hunters expect to get some thrilling sport in their outing. They will return to the mainland Sunday night.”


April 30, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A robust party of cowboys and other men employees will leave here tomorrow for a wild boar hunt on Santa Rosa Island. The trip will be made in Captain Eaton’s power launch Sea Wolf. The party will remain on the island over Sunday, and expects an exciting time, as ‘wild hawg’ shooting is a sport at once thrilling and dangerous.”


April 30, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Having located all the seals he wants, Captain Ira K. Eaton is now waiting for calm weather so he can go to San Miguel Island and capture the sleek animals. The captain returned last night from a scouting trip of several days around the island, taken to locate the seals. The swell was so heavy, however, that he was unable to come near enough to capture them. Captain Eaton plans to leave Monday, and will return with 15 seals.”


May 4, 1915 [SBMP]: “Ship Aggi is fast on shoals off Santa Rosa Island. Leaving San Francisco last Thursday, craft is caught in storm and breaking from tow is cast adrift... For several days the Aggi has been floundering about, but the wind remained very strong. It was impossible to get a piece of canvas aloft. Attempts proved futile, as the gale would tear each piece to shreds. The it proved a case of floundering and this came to an end yesterday afternoon when the vessel went to the shoal and Captain Ira Eaton, who arrived here late last night, reported her position was precarious…”


May 5, 1915 [LAT]: “Santa Barbara. Facing a driving rain and in the teeth of a stiff gale, the powerboat Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton, left this afternoon for Santa Rosa Island, carrying a dispatcher to the freighter Aggi, which is reported aground on the west end of the island… Captain Eaton expects to take the crew to San Miguel Island where there area accommodations, Captain W. G. Waters of this city having large bunkhouses there for his sheep herders…”


May 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “No word was received yesterday in regard to the condition of the Aggi, which went on Talcott Shoal at the west end of Santa Rosa. Captain Ira Eaton, who brought news to the mainland, left yesterday afternoon for the scene of the wreck and will probably not be back until something has been determined as to the fate of the vessel...”


May 6, 1915 [SBMP]:Aggi and cargo are total loss. Captain Olsen remains on board until ship breaks in two. Crew is in Santa Barbara awaiting transportation north. After a terrible pounding on the rocks at Talcott’s Reef, two miles off the northwestern corner of Santa Rosa Island, since last Monday afternoon, when she was blown, helpless, onto the shoal, the full-rigged Norwegian ship Aggi broke in two last Tuesday night, there being aboard the doomed craft at the time her captain, A. Olsen, Scotty Cunningham of the Sea Wolf’s crew, and Sol Gerow of Santa Barbara. When the final disaster in the rough history of the ship came, these men took to a small boat and made for the island shore. This news was brought to the mainland yesterday noon by Captain Ira K. Eaton, who was the first to report the perilous fate of the Aggi, last Monday night, when he returned in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, and gave The Morning Press the information regarding the vessel’s woeful mishap. Since that time Captain Eaton has made several trips to the scene of the wreck, from which he brought members of the Aggi’s crew to the mainland last Tuesday. Captain Olsen came over in the Sea Wolf yesterday. He had stayed with his ship as long as there was any ship to stay with, and then had bidden her a sad, almost heartbroken, farewell because there was nothing else to do. The Aggi left San Francisco on Thursday of last week, bound to a Swedish port with a cargo consisting of 2500 tons of barley and 600 tons of beans. She was in tow of the steamer Edgar Vance, expecting to be towed down the coast and through the Panama Canal, and then proceed under sail to her port destination… The plight of the Aggi was first discovered by Captain Eaton, who had lost a painter and was looking for it off Santa Rosa Island, when he saw a distress signal flying from the island…”


May 6, 1915 [LAT]: “Stranded ship torn to bits. Heroic skipper aboard all night with the rats. Crew is sent ashore while he keeps his vigil. Underwriters in charge but wreck is total loss. Lashed by mad seas and hammered against the rocks of Talcott Reef, the Norwegian ship Aggi Norge went to pieces this morning…”


May 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Eaton of the Sea Wolf having made arrangements to take six or eight excursion parties to the islands within the next ten days, and his boat now being engaged in the salvage of the cargo of the wrecked Aggi off the coast of Santa Rosa Island. He has transferred his excursion business for the present to the Otter, recently arrived from San Pedro.”


May 7, 1915 [SBMP]:Aggi’s cargo may be saved. Captain Ira K. Eaton is working hard at doomed vessel. Forward hold believed to contain 3000 sacks of grain. Captain Curtis of San Francisco, who came down to this city last Tuesday as representative of the underwriters interested in the wreck of the ship Aggi, that lies foundered on Talcott’s Shoal off Santa Rosa Island, returned home yesterday morning, after an inspection of the wreck the day before. While here Captain Curtis, acting for his principals, put the wreck of the Aggi into the hands of Captain Ira K. Eaton for salvage, and E. P. Stevens represents Captain Eaton in the handling of the business in Santa Barbara. At 3;30 yesterday afternoon, Captain Eaton returned from a visit to the wreck, to which he had started last Wednesday at midnight, accompanied by Captain George W. Gourley, two young men from the State Normal School student body, who went along just for the purpose of seeing the wreck, and his regular crew. The Captain brought back from the wreck nine tons of barley, fourteen bolts of canvas, a few sails, the ship’s compass, a lot of tools, and a few miscellaneous articles, all of which had been taken from the stranded vessel and transferred to the Sea Wolf with great difficulty, as the wind was blowing a gale, although at the time it was very calm on the mainland. Captain Eaton reported that he found the Aggi a complete wreck. Since he saw her on the preceding day, the main mast had been swept away, but the hull was resting solidly on the reef, her back broken in two.”


May 8, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Talcott’s Reef in the Sea Wolf yesterday afternoon with another load of barley taken from the wreck of the Aggi. He left at 6 o’clock last evening for another load of the grain, accompanied by Allan Watt and Captain Charles Davis, of the Universal Film Company of Los Angeles, who went for the purpose of getting some photographs of the wreck.”


May 8, 1915 [LAT]: “The salvagers attacked the Aggi Norge today, removing eighty-two tons of her cargo. Captain Eaton estimates that no more than 300 tons can be saved, as the balance is thoroughly water soaked…”


May 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “More salvage in. Yesterday the power schooner Panama of Long Beach, engaged by Captain Eaton to help save the barley cargo of the wrecked Aggi, came over with its first load, and went back for another. Captain Eaton also came in with the Sea Wolf loaded down to the guards with the grain, and about as soon as it was landed, he too returned to the wreck to repeat the operation.”


May 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton sees possibilities for development. For years past there has been much complaint among the people of this city that there were no adequate facilities here for crossing the channel for the purpose of inspecting the natural beauties of what many people who are competent to judge of such matters declare one of the most beautiful islands on earth, Santa Cruz… If present plans of Captain Ira K. Eaton do not miscarry, such a boat will soon be available to the people of Santa Barbara…”


May 13, 1915 [SBMP]: “After wet barley. Continuing in her work of helping in the salvage of the grain on the wrecked ship Aggi, fast on Talcott’s Shoal, the power schooner Panama left again for the wreck yesterday afternoon to get another load. Captain Eaton will arrive today with another load in the Sea Wolf. All the barley now left on the Aggi is wet, but it is said to make good chicken feed after being dried out, and although it must be sold at a low price, it is said to be well worth saving under the present plans employed.”


May 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Eaton and Captain Davis, the latter representing the Universal Film Company, the moving picture concern that has bought the wreck of the Aggi to use as photoplay material, went to the wreck in the Sea Wolf yesterday and will return today.”


May 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, accompanied by his trusty first mate, Scotty Cunningham, will go to the islands in the Sea Wolf today in quest of seals for Captain George M. McGuire, who has an order for 26 California black seals and four Steller lions. The latter, which are very much harder to find and to capture than are the black fellows, are said to be in rather larger supply this year than for many seasons past. They are to be found only on the almost inaccessible rocks of San Miguel, much of the year impossible to approach on account of the rough water surrounding the island, and the finding of these wild and vicious sea animals is the smallest part of it, for it takes real bravery and a high grade of special skill to capture them.”


May 19, 1915 [SBMP]: “Too rough for sealing. Captain Ira K. Eaton had planned to go to the islands for seals in the Sea Wolf yesterday, but the high winds and rough water made that sort of an expedition impractical, as it would be impossible to enter the cave in small boats. He will leave for the quest today if conditions of the water should be more favorable.”


May 23, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left for the islands in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning on a sealing expedition to get a lot of seals for Captain George M. McGuire.”


May 29, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Seventeen fine, fat, husky seals are reposing in unaccustomed quarters here today, having been brought in from the sea caves at Anacapa Island last night by Captain Ira K. Eaton in the Sea Wolf. Attempts were made to capture Steller lions at San Miguel, but the water was too rough.”


May 30, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton will go to San Miguel Island tomorrow to take to her home Mrs. John Russell, wife of the superintendent of the island. Mrs. Russell recently returned from Los Angeles where she had submitted to a serious surgical operation that was, happily, entirely successful, and she returns to her island home with pleasing prospects of the recovery of her former good health.”


June 1, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned Sunday evening from San Miguel Island and went to Los Angeles yesterday on business connected with his boat.”


June 7, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Pelican Bay Camp is to open within the next two weeks. This is the word passed out this morning by Captain Ira Eaton. Another bit of news is that Captain Eaton is now negotiating for a bigger powerboat to make special Sunday excursions to the island. He expects to make a specialty of these Sunday trips. The boat he has in view, and for which a deal will be closed shortly, is licensed to carry 150 passengers, but Captain Eaton expects to make 110 its limit, so that there will be no crowding, and all making the trip will have a good time without the least suggestion of inconvenience. Today Captain Eaton put a crew of painters to work on the Sea Wolf, getting it brightened up for the opening of the summer season. It will require about two weeks to complete the painting of the boat.”


June 8, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A fog horn, which the captain contemplates selling either to a fish dealer, or using it to call back the dogs after a wild boar hunt on Santa Cruz Island, was brought back today by Captain Ira K. Eaton, from the wrecked schooner Aggi, which has gone to pieces on Talcott Shoal, at the west end of Santa Rosa Island. The noise-maker produces a sound which makes a Klaxon sound like a mouse squeak in comparison. It is operated by turning a crank like a hand-organ, and can be heard about two miles away on a still day, so that it is too noisy for domestic use. The captain also brought over a huge three sheaf block from the wreck.”


June 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “Traffic to islands. Captain Ira Eaton sees possibility for development. For years past there has been much complaint among the people of this city that there were no adequate facilities here for crossing the channel for the purpose of inspecting the natural beauties of what many people who are competent to judge such matters declare one of the most beautiful islands on earth, Santa Cruz… If the present plans of Captain Eaton do not miscarry, such a boat will soon be available to the people of Santa Barbara. He is negotiating for the lease of a fine new boat that was built for the excursion business in the run between San Francisco and the Farallone islands, for the World’s Fair visitors…”


June 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira K. Eaton will take a party of Potter Hotel guests in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, to Pelican Bay for the day. The visitors, who have never yet seen the beautiful Santa Cruz Island, anticipate a happy experience at this charming resort.”


June 11, 1915 [SBDN]: “Facilities for island visits are increasing. Growing popularity of island retreats leads to number of powerboats. Better and ample facilities for visiting Santa Cruz and the other Channel Islands, famed throughout the world for their natural beauty, will be offered to Santa Barbarans by July 1, than ever before. Early next week, Captain Ira K. Eaton expects to conclude negotiations for a magnificent passenger vessel, the finest and largest ever carrying passengers to the islands from this port. The boat is 120 feet long, with staterooms, berths, cabins, and all equipment for carrying more than 100 passengers in comfort each trip. The vessel has a speed of 22 miles, developed by engines of 500 horse power, and should make the 26 mile trip in an hour and a quarter or less, where with the present fastest boat the time is two hours and a half. $2.50 round trip fare will be charged. The present rate in the smaller boats is $2. The big craft was built for transporting excursionists during exposition year, from San Francisco to the Farallone islands. To date, the business done has not been large enough in volume to pay expenses, fair visitors apparently not being sufficiently interested in ocean trips with so many objects of interest to see at the exposition. Captain Eaton is negotiating for a lease of the boat and expects to conclude the deal next week. At the present time, there is only one boat, the Otter, Captain R. Vasquez, engaged in the passenger-carrying business between this city and the islands… The Sea Wolf, Captain Eaton’s present boat, will probably also be placed in service, should the demand be sufficient…” [Apparently the deal fell through.]


June 13, 1915 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira K. Eaton will take a party of thirty people to Santa Cruz Island in his jaunty little powerboat, the Sea Wolf. The Painted Cave will be visited, and the excursionists will see the principal beauty spots of the island and return to the mainland in the evening.”


June 15, 1915 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira K. Eaton will go to Pelican Bay in his power beat, the Sea Wolf, to fit up his camp there for the summer. He will make some good improvements in the main camp houses and put twelve tents at once and get things in order to erect more as fast as they shall be required to handle the excursion business, which he expects to be much larger this year than ever before.”


June 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton went to Pelican Bay in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, yesterday morning to set up his camp there. He will return today or tomorrow.”


June 17, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned yesterday morning in the Sea Wolf from Pelican Bay, where he is re-establishing his island camp for the summer. He says that he will have this year the best and most complete camp that has ever been known on Santa Cruz Island, and that he has several reservations already by Santa Barbara and Montecito parties that demand only the best of accommodations.”


June 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left sometime yesterday morning for Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf. He will return sometime tomorrow, and at midnight he will take aboard an outing party of twenty-five men, most of them employees of Hunt Mercantile Company, who will go to Eaton’s camp at Pelican Bay on a fishing expedition. The party will return home Sunday evening.”


June 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “Fishing at the islands is said to be very good now. Captain Ira Eaton reports that last Wednesday he caught four fine yellowtail opposite Pelican Bay after a few minutes of trolling. This variety is one of the gamiest fish in these waters, and is the delight of the deep sea angler. It is, moreover, of the finest quality for the table. These fish, it is reported, are running strong in the island waters.”


June 18, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton is a busy man these days. He is at Pelican Bay today, and tomorrow night will take to that part of Santa Cruz Island in his boat Sea Wolf, a party of Hunt Mercantile Company men employees and others, for a fishing trip there.”


June 27, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left yesterday morning for Pelican Bay with a party of Montecito people who will camp there for a week.”


June 29, 1915 [SBDNI]: “After passing a week on Santa Cruz Island, George Owen Knapp and party of Montecito, returned to this city today in the Sea Wolf owned by Captain I. K. Eaton. The party enjoyed mountain climbing on the island, and rode the Caire ranch horses, making their headquarters at the big ranch, as guests of the family.”


June 30, 1915 [SBMP]:Sea Wolf returns. Captain Ira K. Eaton returned yesterday morning from Pelican Bay, to which resort he took last Saturday, the family of George Owen Knapp and Joseph G. Colman, Jr., for a camping sojourn at the bay. The captain says that the campers are having the happiest kind of time, and that they have made some notable catches of fish during the past two or three days. They expect to return to their homes next Saturday.”


July 1, 1915 [SBMP]: “Fred Hamilton is organizing an island party for the 4th of July, to leave Saturday morning at 6:30 in the Sea Wolf for Valdez Harbor. Most of the party will be from Carpinteria, but there will also be quite a number of people from this city. It is expected that about thirty-five will join this outing. The Painted Cave will be visited, and the night's camp will be made at Valdez. Early Monday morning the party will visit the seal rookeries in China Harbor, after will come luncheon at Captain Eaton's camp at Pelican Bay, with the return voyage scheduled to enable the excursionists to arrive home early enough Monday afternoon to see at least a good part of the patriotic celebration on the mainland.”


July 17, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, skipper of the powerboat Sea Wolf, and proprietor of the popular island resort at Pelican Bay on Santa Cruz Island, is about to inaugurate a new feature in his island operation. The captain has recently been presented by Mr. Cowles, superintendent of the Fithian Ranch, with twenty young carrier pigeons, and he will soon have a pigeon messenger service between Pelican Bay and the mainland. He has already started the training of one pair, and he thinks the birds will be able to work the full distance of the channel's width within two or three weeks. Other birds will be put in training as fast as they reach the right age and strength, and it will not be long before all of them will be able to meet all demands upon them for the peculiar service to which they are bred.”


July 21, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday, and this morning he will take to that popular island resort a party of fifteen Montecito people who will spend a couple of days there, returning to the mainland tomorrow night. Captain Eaton has recently bought a small powerboat which will be used on the island shores for trolling. It is twenty-eight feet long, and with eight foot beam, and it is said to be admirably adopted to the purpose for which it is intended. The boat, which was bought in Ventura, will be brought to Santa Barbara next Monday, and taken from here to Pelican Bay.”


July 25, 1915 [SBMP]: “Last evening Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, in the Sea Wolf, with a party of thirty people intent on spending a long Sunday enjoying the charms of that popular resort. The captain will return with his craft this morning in time to leave again at 8 o'clock with W. A. Brackenridge of Pasadena, vice president of the Southern California Edison Company...”


July 28, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned to Pelican Bay yesterday morning in the Sea Wolf, and with his newest addition to his fleet, the Seal, in tow…”


July 28, 1915 [SBMP]: “Word has been received in this city to the effect that Herman Norden, the retired cotton broker of New York City who spent five or six weeks at the Potter Hotel last winter, expected to return to Santa Barbara in the near future. He was very much pleased with this region… He is a most famous deep-sea fisherman… one on the most delightful of his experiences was his indulgence in that sport in company with Captain Eaton along the island shores.”


August 1, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton will take a party of excursionists to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf this morning...”


August 3, 1915 [SBMP]: “This fish yarn seems quite possible. Mariners stake whale claim then Captain Eaton jumps it. When George A. Batchelder, W. A. Brackenridge and R. H. Gaud went to Pelican Bay on a fishing trip a week ago… they discovered a huge object floating on the surface of the water, and soon discovered that it was a dead whale… The following morning as Captain Eaton was returning from a trip to Santa Barbara in the Sea Wolf, he saw the bog floating mass of flesh as he approached the island harbor, and he changed course of his boat and sailed up to the whale… and he passed a line around the defunct body of the monster and towed it around the east end of the island out to sea, where he set the big mass adrift.”


August 4, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton leaves for Pelican Bay this morning with a party of campers who will spend a week or more at that charming island resort. The passenger list includes people from Montecito and Santa Paula.”


August 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “George Spencer Westcott and John W. Banhans left Wednesday morning with Captain Eaton on the Sea Wolf for the islands where they will spend their vacation in fishing and exploring the many wonders which are to be found there.”


August 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Tonight Captain Ira K. Eaton will take a party of twenty-five people to Pelican Bay to spend Sunday. Next Monday the same boat will take to the same place a dozen campers who will stay there for a week or longer. There are now at the bay twenty-two campers from Ventura, Santa Paula and Carpinteria, with prospects for a large number of others in the near future.”


August 17, 1915 [SBDNI]: “The Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton’s power launch, which had been at San Pedro undergoing repairs and overhauling for the past two weeks, is back again and ready to resume her traffic to the islands.”


August 22, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton took a party of campers to Pelican Bay last Friday morning and returned to the mainland last night to take another party to the bay this morning to spend Sunday.”


August 23, 1915 [SBDNI]: “… The fishing fleet came up to establish headquarters at Pelican Bay, but finding no sardines and anchovies there to use for bait they moved down to Smugglers Cove, where bait was plentiful. Mr. Reynolds, who returned yesterday from two weeks camping with Captain Eaton at his summer resort at Pelican Bay, said this morning that albacore was not the only fish extremely plentiful at the islands just now. He in company with a few others from the camp caught 200 pounds of rock cod in a little over an hour one day and 300 pounds in about the same time another day.”


August 31, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton took a camping party in the Sea Wolf to Pelican Bay last Sunday morning.”


September 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “The island excursion season ends today for the Sea Wolf, and tomorrow Captain Eaton will join the large albacore fleet operating in the waters around the islands.”


September 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “Last night the Sea Wolf took out a fishing party composed of ten railroad men who were after gamey albacore. Captain Eaton will take the anglers to a point about midway between Santa Cruz and San Nicolas islands, in which region about 300 San Pedro boats are regularly congregated in the hunt for albacore for the canneries at the southern city named. This party will return tonight.”


September 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “Last night the Sea Wolf took out a fishing party composed of ten railroad men who were after gamey albacore. Captain Eaton will take the anglers to a point about midway between Santa Cruz and San Nicolas islands, in which region about 300 San Pedro boats are regularly congregated in the hunt for albacore for the canneries at the southern city named. This party will return tonight.”


September 8, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton will take Captain Waters to San Miguel Island today for an inspection by the latter of his sheep range on the island, and a general looking into his affairs there.”


September 10, 1915 [OC]: “Captain Eaton’s launch Sea Wolf will join the fleet of albacore fishing boats in the island waters. The island excursion season has closed. Many Oxnard people have made the trip to Santa Cruz aboard the Sea Wolf.”


September 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “Mr. and Mrs. Ogram of Los Angeles and J. J. Ogram of Barry, Ill., who has been visiting his sister, Mrs. O. J. Eaton of 320 E. Victoria Street, have returned from the Panama-Pacific Exposition and left yesterday morning on Captain Ira Eaton’s boat, the Sea Wolf, for Santa Cruz Island. Mrs. Eaton accompanied them to San Francisco. This is J. J. Ogram’s first visit to the coast, and he is much pleased with California in general and Santa Barbara in particular.”


September 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “This morning the Sea Wolf will take a small party of Miramar people to Pelican Bay for two or three days of camping. Captain Eaton has a number of charters for the near future, and has been persuaded to defer for a few weeks the closing of his excursion season to go into fishing traffic.”


September 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton went to Pelican Bay with the Sea Wolf yesterday morning, taking over to that popular island resort a small party for a few days’ camping.”


October 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday afternoon Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Santa Rosa Island waters after a load of fish, the morning hours having been devoted by the boat and her skipper to posing for a scene in a nautical picture by Flying A Company.”


October 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “Seek white seal in island caves: Pasadena naturalists reach channel on quest of rare specimen… The seal sharps are anxiously awaiting the result of this scientific quest… Captain Ira Eaton, who has caught nearly all the seals that have been captured in the island waters during the past few years and seen a few hundred times as many as he has taken from their amphibian habitat, merely remarked in reply ‘No these island seals are mostly magenta.’”


October 27, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning for supplies for his camp of Universal actors who are at work on the island shores... The Sea Wolf returned to the island yesterday afternoon.”


October 29, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned on the Sea Wolf yesterday afternoon from the camp of Universal actors at Pelican Bay, the company having been engaged there and at other points along the island shores...”


November 6, 1915 [SBMP]: Sunday evening Captain Ira K. Eaton returned in the Sea Wolf from the camp at Pelican Bay, which had been the headquarters of Henry Otto’s company of Universal actors for nineteen days during the production of Undine, a great marine photoplay. Seven members of the company, the last detachment of the party, came back to the mainland on this trip and returned to their homes in Los Angeles by train.”


December 23, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton is looking for better business than ever. Yesterday morning Captain Ira K. Eaton, accompanied by his wife and daughter, returned from San Pedro, where he took his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, two weeks ago for a general overhauling and remodeling. He says the Sea Wolf is in better shape than when she was just built… Captain Eaton, who was very busy with the Sea Wolf in the excursion business the past season, expects a far larger one and he will make arrangements to handle it in the best of shape. He will add to the Eaton fleet a larger and better boat than any he has had yet…”


January 6, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning, bringing 1,100 pounds of whitefish... His camp at Pelican Bay will be largely augmented in the capacity of an improved order, and his transportation facilities will be increased materially. In fact, the captain declares that he is going after the business, and that he will equip himself to take good care of all that comes his way.”


January 6, 1916 [SBDN]: “One thousand one hundred pounds of whitefish were brought here yesterday from Pelican Bay by Captain Ira Eaton. The captain reports that things are very quiet on the island now, but that he is preparing to start the island travel early this year and will fit up to handle more island travelers than ever before.”


January 20, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who came over from Pelican Bay last Monday in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, with a good catch of fish, leaves for the island caves this morning in search of seals, he having an order for eleven of the amphibians [sic] for Captain George M. McGuire. The seals are for a trainer in London, but the buyer receives and pays for them in New York, Captain McGuire declining to take chances on the depredations of German submarines.”


January 20, 1916 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left this morning in his powerboat Sea Wolf, for the seal rookeries on Santa Cruz Island, to secure eleven seals for Captain McGuire. The seals ordered for a London trainer.”


January 21, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from Pelican Bay last Monday in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, with a good catch of fish. He leaves for the island caves this morning in search of seals, he having an order for eleven of the amphibians [sic] for Captain George M. Maguire. The seals are for a trainer in London, but the buyer receives and pays for them in New York, Captain Maguire declining to take chances on the depredations of German submarines.”


January 21, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who for several years past has done the most of the island excursion business from this port, is preparing for larger operations this coming season. The captain's camp at Pelican Bay will be greatly enlarged and otherwise improved...”


January 25, 1916 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning Captain Ira Eaton came over from Pelican Bay with eleven seals caught in the island caves for Captain George W. McGuire…”


January 25, 1916 [LAT]: “Eighteen seals, the biggest catch made in years, were brought in tonight from Santa Cruz Island by Captain Ira Eaton for Captain George M. McGuire. Five will brave German submarines in being shipped to a London trainer. This will be the first seal consignment crossing the Atlantic since the war began. Six will be turned loose in Guadalupe Lake, in the northern part of the country, to this out the fish. The lake, a private property owned by the Guadalupe Gun Club, is overstocked with fish. They are so numerous that there is actually not swimming room. This is the first time the lake has been known to become overstocked.”


January 28, 1916 [Lompoc Journal]: “The biggest catch of seals made in two years was brought to Santa Barbara Monday by Captain Eaton from Santa Cruz Island for Captain George M. McGuire. There are eighteen seals in the catch, all of them in the pink of condition, and declared by Captain McGuire to be about the finest lot yet brought to the mainland. Five of the seals go to London for a trainer. They will be shipped immediately, and en route will have care at Kansas City and Chicago, in fact there will be no time but that the express company will have them under careful watch. At New York they will be turned over to agents for the London firm, and there Captain McGuire's responsibility will cease. This will be the first consignment of seals crossing the Atlantic since the war. They will have to run the submarine blockade. Six of the seals will be turned over to the Guadalupe Gun Club, to be released in Guadalupe Lake. The lake, or lakes, are overstocked with fish and the gun club believes that the six seals will soon reduce the number. The fish are so plentiful that they are actually crowded for swimming space. No such condition has obtained in the lake ever before, so far as known. The remainder of the seals will be shipped to various parts of the United States. Captain McGuire states that all the seals trained for the circuses come from the Channel Islands. On the trip just so successfully ended, Captain Eaton was the only man along with any experience capturing the seals, but the catch was made without difficulty or mishap.”


January 29, 1916 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira K. Eaton will return to Pelican Bay in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf. In the early part of next week the captain will take his craft to San Pedro to have installed in her a new engine of forty horse power, an increase of ten horse power over the engine now in use. The new engine will give the Sea Wolf a good deal more speed than she now has, and enable her skipper to cross the channel in two and one half hours.”


January 29, 1916 [SBDN]: “The Sea Wolf will be taken to San Pedro early next week and Captain Eaton will have a forty-horse-power engine installed. This will give the boat a much more powerful engine than the one now in use, and with the improvement Captain Eaton expects to cross the channel in two hours and a half.”


February 3, 1916 [SBDN]: “Regular trips to the islands will be made this summer by Captain Eaton in his boat, the Sea Wolf. The captain is planning for a big season and in order to make his boat speedier he has ordered a forty-horse-power engine to replace the present engine of 30-horse-power. It was expected that the engine would be installed early this week, but it has not arrived at San Pedro yet. It will be put in next week. Captain Eaton expects to commence regular trips to the island June 1.”


February 4, 1916 [LAT]: “Santa Claus is just getting to the sheep herders on San Miguel Island on his 1915 trip. Today the Sea Wolf left here for the island with the gifts sent for the men over two years ago. ‘Don’t open until Xmas’ is the legend on the packages. This will be the first supply ship to stop at the island since the packages arrived here.”


February 11, 1916 [SBMP]: “Mystery craft sighted at Goleta. Ship makes appearance, but mists interfere with flying… Captain Ira Eaton is the latest person to report having seen the aircraft. That was a week ago Sunday evening, on the same night when others reported it for the first time. He was coming from the islands when the thing suddenly swooped towards the Sea Wolf. At one time it could only have been a couple of hundred yards away. Captain Eaton says he could not hear any motor at the time. Captain Eaton’s excuse for not reporting it before, is that he was afraid people would not believe it, but say it was one of his marine yarns…”


February 17, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Santa Cruz Island in his boat, the Sea Wolf, yesterday morning with an order for six seals for Captain George M. McGuire...”


March 12, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton has returned from San Pedro in the Sea Wolf, after having the craft fitted with a new engine of fifty horsepower. He says the Sea Wolf is now able to cross the channel in two hours and a half.”


March 24, 1916 [SBDN]: “Development of the camping possibilities on Santa Cruz Island are expected to take on extensive activity this summer. It is reported that Los Angeles interests are making inquiries concerning long concessions, and if suitable arrangements can be made it is said they will not only put up a very modern lodge of 100 or more rooms, but also install a camp with water piped to each tent, and the tents floored and furnished. Besides this, it is stated, if the lodge is built, a federal license for a wireless station will be secured, and the proprietors will have a news bulletin board on which the events of the world will be recorded fresh from the ticker, and a pleasure wharf will be built, where passengers can effect an easy landing without the surf boat gliding, now necessary. The rapid growth of Santa Barbara is said to be one of the reasons why large interests are now looking to the islands. The men planning all this development want a lease running 50 years at least. They propose to pay well for it, if they can have exclusive resort privileges. Even should this very pretentious scheme not develop this summer, Captain Ira Eaton will have a larger camp, it is said, and add materially to the comforts and convenience of the place, which he has made famous, besides which Captain Vasquez also hopes to open his camp. It is expected neither of these camps will open before June, through Captain Eaton may be induced by the demand to open up earlier.”


March 28, 1916 [SBDN]: “The launch Panama, now in the Gulf of Mexico, will be here on June 1 to start regular excursions to Santa Cruz Island for a period of four months, Captain Ira Eaton announced today. Captain Eaton will also have his Sea Wolf making regular trips to the island at that time, both boats being under his direction. The contract, which he has for the Panama, calls for its use here during June, July, August and September. The Panama is a launch capable of carrying one hundred people, Captain Eaton said today. He believes that the summer business to the island will prove very good and pointed out that in his place on the island, there are now accommodations for fifty people. Since the Sea Wolf has had its new engine installed, and has been used in local work, a great many parties have taken advantage of the opportunities Santa Barbara offers as a watering place and have gone out for a sail on the briny. The owners of the launch Freda, who were here yesterday, in consultation with Secretary McIsaac of the Chamber of Commerce, and Milo M. Potter of the Potter Hotel, returned last night to Long Beach without definitely saying whether they would make Santa Barbara the home port of that boat. The situation here was investigated thoroughly and the men will come to a decision in a short time. With the Panama and the Sea Wolf and the possibility of having the Freda work out of the local port on excursions, Santa Barbara will be well on its way to take its place with the coast towns as a watering place of the first class.”


March 29, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton goes to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf this morning to take a small party of Potter Hotel guests.”


April 7, 1916 [SBDN]: “William Farnum, director of 30 actors of the Fox Motion Picture Company of Los Angeles, and Sidney D. Gray, formerly with the old Santa Barbara Motion Picture Company, sailed for Santa Cruz Island today, aboard Captain Eaton’s launch to film a marine picture. Harry Pollard and his company of 30 are already on the island, making over 60 actors now colonizing Eaton’s camp. Pollard has just taken over additional actors. He was here last evening. ‘We are taking the finest pictures that were ever filmed, I really believe,’ said the director. ‘There is no other place on the globe where pictures can be excel those offered by the rugged scenery of Santa Cruz Island.’ Captain Eaton will tomorrow take over a party of American players for a brief visit, just to snatch a few pictures in completing a film. The American discovered the islands as a paradise for the motion picture artist.”


April 9, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton goes to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf this morning to take over Harry Pollard's camp ten extra people to assist in Pollard's production of the photoplay on which he and his big company are engaged on the island, The Pearl of Paradise... Captain Eaton will return from the island this evening.”


April 13, 1916 [SBMP]: “Pelican Bay, Captain Ira K. Eaton's Santa Cruz Island camp, is just now the center of great activity in the moving pictures business...”


April 16, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Eaton came from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday to bring over seven members of the Fox Company of moving picture actors now on the island working on the photoplay, The Game of Hearts...”


April 20, 1916 [SBMP]: “Yesterday Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from Pelican Bay with a number of Flying A actors who had just finished their work on scenes for the play, The Secret of the Submarine. The captain returned to the island last evening.”


April 24, 1916 [SBDNI]: “Two women and man lost four days on Santa Cruz. After spending four days and three nights lost on Santa Cruz Island without wraps, fire or food, except mussels and prickly pears, Miss May Christal, girls’ physical director in the public schools; Miss Mary Anderson, junior college student, and Henry Campbell of the County National Bank were brought home here at two o’clock this morning, famished and cold. With seven others, the three left here several days ago for a week’s camping on the island. Thursday morning the entire party sailed around the island and landed near the ranch house. Miss Anderson, Miss Christal and Mr. Campbell decided that they would walk back across the island to their camp. They were warned by Captain Eaton of the boat that the walk was a hard one, but persisted in going… They could not get their bearings… The twenty-four hours without food or protection from the night cold told on them, and when they reached a little cove at Hazards they decided to stop until the boat came after them, having no idea of their location. Most of the time was taken in securing mussels and prickly pears. The nights were so cold they could not sleep…”


April 25, 1916 [SBMP]: “Three get lost on Santa Cruz Island. Three days and nights spent living decidedly close to nature… They were members of the excursion organized by junior college students who went in the Sea Wolf on Friday of the week before last for a week’s camping at Fry’s Harbor… The captain’s [Eaton] vigil was finally rewarded in seeing the lost people on a high cliff near the shore three miles above Cueva Valdez, and fifteen miles from the camp of Fry’s…”


April 28, 1916 [SBDN]: “Orders for twenty seals have been received by Captain George M. McGuire, and Captain Ira Eaton, now at the islands in the Sea Wolf, will try to bring back the number that is needed. Among the orders which Captain McGuire has received is one for two seals of a rare species, wanted for the National Park in Washington, D.C.”


May 2, 1916 [SBMP]: “Yesterday afternoon Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from San Miguel Island in the Sea Wolf, bringing Captain Waters and a force of sheep shearers who have been working there for several weeks making the spring clip. Captain Eaton returned to Pelican Bay a few days later to hunt for seals for Captain George M. McGuire, his order being twenty seals.”


May 7, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton spent yesterday on the mainland, he having brought over from the islands a lot of seals, twenty in number, that he had caught in the island caves for Captain George M. McGuire. He still has an order for one of the enormous Stellers seals, but has had no chance to find them as yet, they being discoverable only on San Miguel Island or in rookeries between here and Monterey. Of the seals secured, Mr. McGuire has shipped six to London and the others to various points in this country.”


May 7, 1916 [SBMP]: “Alex Carrese of San Francisco has, through an arrangement with Captain Ira K. Eaton, taken Fry's Harbor on Santa Cruz Island, for the season, and will furnish it completely as an island camp for fishermen and outing parties. He will put up a lot of tents, comfortably furnished, and for the benefit of those who do not want the trouble of cooking, he will operate a tent dining room at which to feed 'all comers.' A number of skiffs will be available to visitors to the camp, and a full supply of fishing tackle will be available to visitors to the camp, with other features to add to the pleasure of all who may seek the charms of this harbor, one of the finest on the island shores.”


May 12, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton goes to San Miguel Island in the Sea Wolf this morning to take Mr. Thatcher, representing the board of underwriters of San Francisco Board of Trade, to investigate certain phases of the wreck of the Norwegian steamer Aggi, which went to pieces on a reef off Santa Rosa Island about a year ago. The Sea Wolf has been chartered for four days for this expedition.”


May 12, 1916 [SBMP]: “A Montecito party has chartered Captain Eaton's Sea Wolf for all of the following week. The party will camp at Pelican Bay and use the boat for fishing excursions and trips up and down and around the island shores during the stay at that charming resort.”


May 26, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton leaves today for San Pedro, where he has bought a small powerboat that he will use at his Pelican Bay camp for trolling. It will accommodate four or five people comfortably for this purpose, and will be a great convenience to the patrons of the beautiful island resort who are fond of fishing. It is said to be a good little boat with a ten horse-power engine. Captain Eaton will sail it to his island port himself, and will probably be here with it about next Monday.”


May 17, 1916 [SBDN]: “Because of the rapid growth of the summer colony on Santa Cruz Island, there are now plans afoot to establish a radio station at Captain Ira Eaton’s camp for rapid connection with the mainland. It is predicted that this summer will see over twice the ordinary number of island colonists. Captain Eaton has elaborate plans for his camp, and the need of a radio station is realized. It is explained that the naval militia could maintain a station and work with their station here. By reducing the power of the machine it is believed the federal government would issue a license, so it could be operated between certain periods of each day. Last year attempts were made to flash messages, but mirrors of sufficient size could not be secured. It is believed that the radio station will be established and in service by June 15, an application having already been made to the government. Many wealthy Montecito families are planning to spend a portion of the summer on the island, which adds additional reason for the installation of the proposed station.”


June 3, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from the islands in his powerboat, Sea Wolf, last evening with eight fine seals taken in the island caves for Captain George M. McGuire. The lot included three very large bulls, weighing from 500 to 600 pounds each. The captain started on the return to Pelican Bay at 3 o'clock this morning. He will bring to the mainland tomorrow a party of four Miramar people who have been at bay camp for the past two weeks. On the following Sunday the Sea Wolf will resume its regular Sunday excursions to the islands, the captain having made unusually good arrangements at Pelican Bay for handling the excursion and camping business this season.”


June 3, 1916 [SBDN]: “Eight fine seals were brought from the islands late yesterday afternoon by Captain Ira K. Eaton for Captain George McGuire. Captain Eaton proposed to start his regular Sunday excursions to the island a week from tomorrow.”


June 16, 1916 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Pelican Bay in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, with a lot of lumber and other materials for the building of a store house there, the idea being to establish and operate a general store for the accommodation of campers and others on the island. The captain has his camp in better shape than ever before to handle a large number of outing parties, of which he has made reservations for many. He has twenty-four tents, all comfortably furnished, and is preparing to pipe water to the camp from the excellent spring 1000 feet away, at the foot of the canyon. A new pump has been bought for the pumping of the water, and it will be operated with a gasoline engine that will fill a tank on the bluff.”


June 17, 1916 [SBDN]: “Wild turkey shooting on Santa Rosa [Cruz] Island may be enjoyed in a year or two if the plans of Captain Ira Eaton, whose camp on the island is the resort of many summer parties, can be carried out. Captain Eaton has been hunting for turkey eggs for the past week or two and he plans to hatch them out on the island and let the young birds run wild. It is believed that there is plenty of feed on the island to keep the turkeys in good health. There are a few natural enemies to turkeys on the island and the captain has every hope that the great sport of wild turkey hunting may be revived on the island. If he is successful the Captain will have one of the finest game preserves in the west, for wild turkeys are great game and great sport to shoot.”


June 28, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton went to Pelican Bay in his powerboat, Sea Wolf, yesterday morning, taking a party of Montecito men bent on a fishing cruise. The captain reports very good fishing in the island waters now… The Eaton camp at Pelican Bay is in better shape this year than ever before…”


July 5, 1916 [FTWS]: “Vanishing race of Channel Islands. New baffling mystery of Pacific… DeMoss Bowers, famous archaeologist, and Milton Carlson, expert on hieroglyphics, are now making arrangements for the exploration trip… After exploring the coastline, Bowers and Carlson, with their party, will go from Santa Barbara to the Channel Islands on the yacht Sea Wolf, owned by Captain Ira Eaton…”


July 9, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from the island in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, yesterday morning, with two seals for Captain McGuire. Captain Eaton will this morning resume his regular Sunday excursion to Pelican Bay. For this trip he will take over about twenty passengers who will have dinner at the island camp and return to the mainland in the evening.”


July 14, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday to take to Fry’s Harbor this afternoon a party of forty of the State Normal students who will remain on the island until Sunday afternoon…”


July 18, 1916 [SBMP]: “A party of thirty-five Normal students and faculty returned Sunday evening from a few days camping trip to the islands. The party left at 4 o’clock Friday morning on Captain Eaton’s Sea Wolf. It was a regular camping trip as the party roughed-it from beginning to end…”


July 23, 1916 [SBMP]: “Last evening Captain Ira K. Eaton left for the island in the Sea Wolf with a party of forty young men and women bound for Fry’s Harbor, where arrangements have been made by A. Carese, lessee of that harbor, for a big dance and supper, he having had a large dancing floor laid during the past week. The party will return to the mainland tonight.”


July 27, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from Pelican Bay yesterday bringing a small party of Montecito people who had been enjoying the island for several days. The captain returns to the bay this morning and will come back to the mainland to take over a large party Saturday morning.”


July 30, 1916 [SBMP]: “Yesterday afternoon a party composed of Mr. And Mrs. R. W. Coane, Mr. And Mrs. J. F. Murphy, Mr. And Mrs. Neil Sheridan, Miss Doris Overman, Miss Frances Thompson, Charles Shedd and Edwin Pederson, left in Captain Eaton’s powerboat, the Sea Wolf, for Valdez Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. There the party will camp for a week, and much pleasure is anticipated from the sojourn at this beautiful spot.”


August 2, 1916 [SBMP]: “Yesterday Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf, and this morning he will take over to Pelican Bay for the day a party of guests of Miramar and the Potter Hotel.”


August 3, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday and will return there this morning with another party of campers. The captain reports that the Coane party, which went over last Saturday, is encamped at Fry’s Harbor, and that all the members of the party are having a delightful sojourn on the island. These campers will return home next Sunday.”


August 3, 1916 [SBDN]: “Porpoise hunting promises to be real ‘honest to goodness’ and exciting sport to be developed in the Santa Barbara channel. Captain Ira Eaton will start out on the first hunt about the middle of next week, in his boat the Sea Wolf, with a party of Montecito and Santa Barbara sportsmen. Porpoise are now plentiful in the channel and the Captain reports that he has not made a trip across in the last few weeks when the boat has not passed through two or more schools of the big fish. It will be porpoise hunting — not fishing. A hand-thrown harpoon attached to 1500 feet of the stoutest kind of line and with a couple of kegs attached as floaters in case the big fish gets away from the rod, will be used. Captain Eaton has been practicing lately with a gaff and has hit several fish so that he believes it will be possible to strike the porpoise, which run close to the boat, for awhile, after a school of the big fish have been struck. The fish in the Santa Barbara Channel that are called porpoise are more correctly named seahogs, from the long piggish snout that is characteristic of them. They are not the true porpoise nor are they the dolphins that some people call them. A good specimen weighs about two hundred pounds and is one of the strongest pulling and fastest swimming fish known. Captain Eaton believes that the first few porpoise hit will get away with 1500 feet of line before the hunters learn how to handle the fast swimmers. Where porpoises are caught in any numbers the oil is valuable and the hide may be made into razor straps and other articles. The harpoon used is a small affair that hardly penetrates the fat of the fish. The skin is, however, tough enough to hold the strain when the barb opens the fat.”


October 12, 1916 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton left for the islands late yesterday to get sixteen seals for which George McGuire has an order.”


October 31, 1916 [SCICo]: “We wrote you about Eaton's dogs and his assurance that they would be removed at once. Mrs. Eaton told the writer that these dogs were removed from the island, going to Santa Rosa Island and the other to Santa Barbara. After this we heard the dogs running sheep and made a determined effort but could not get in sight of them either in the hills or Pelican Bay. "Scotty" told Miss Caire that someone had brought both dogs back from Santa Barbara and turned them loose. We sent to Pelican Bay and have brought them to the Main Ranch and are sending them to the pound in Santa Barbara and will notify him to that effect. Cortella tells us that Eaton has made two trips to the Harbor for the dogs. It is probable that the dogs never left the island.”


November 11, 1916 [SBMP]: “H. A. Rogers shipped by express to Chicago yesterday eleven live seals that are destined to compose the star attraction in a winter show running in the big city named. The seals were caught by Captain K. Ira Eaton in the island caves about two weeks ago.”


December 14, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, accompanied by a half a dozen experienced fishermen with their nets, will go to the islands in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, this morning after a load of fish…”


August 27, 1916 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Eaton will take to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf a party of forty people who will spend the day at that charming island resort and return to the mainland this evening.”


August 29, 1916 [SBMP]: “Thirty-nine people were taken over to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf by Captain Eaton last Sunday morning. After a delightful day spent at the beautiful island resort, the party returned to the mainland in the evening, all happy over their day’s outing.”


September 3, 1916 [SBMP]: “Terrier keeps long vigil over dead. Wesley Thompson accidentally killed in island canyon. Lying prone on the ground in a canyon at Pelican Bay at the base of a high cliff, the body of Wesley Thompson was found yesterday shortly after noon by Captain Ira Eaton, who had, just a few minutes before, arrived at the bay resort with a small party, including Mrs. Eaton... Under Coroner Ruiz’s instructions the captain will leave in the Sea Wolf this morning for Pelican Bay to bring back the body for an inquest…”


September 5, 1916 [SBMP]: “The coroner’s inquest on the remains of Wesley Thompson, who was found dead in a canyon at Pelican Bay… The remains were brought over in the Sea Wolf Sunday afternoon, and they were buried in Santa Barbara Cemetery yesterday…”


September 12, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Santa Cruz Island last Sunday evening, bringing over George T. Coles, superintendent of the Fithian Ranch, and his two sons, who had been spending ten days at Pelican Bay, and five sea lions for Captain George M. McGuire… Captain Eaton will take a private party over to Pelican Bay in his boat this morning for a stay of a week at that beautiful island resort.”


October 1, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from Pelican Bay yesterday morning in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf. He had just returned from San Pedro where he took his craft for some minor repairs and for a decided improvement in the way of a new six-inch ironwood keel which skipper Eaton says will operate to make the boat far steadier in the water.”


October 12, 1916 [SBMP]: “Early yesterday afternoon Captain Ira K. Eaton left for Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf with a commission for the capture of sixteen seals for Captain George M. McGuire. Captain Eaton was accompanied by his wife and his regular sealing crew, and they will make their camp at Pelican Bay…”


October 18, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who came over from the islands last Sunday with fourteen seals for Captain George McGuire, returned to the same hunting grounds yesterday morning after six more of the amphibians to complete an order lately received by Captain McGuire from eastern zoos and trainer. With good luck, Eaton will be back with his game within a day or two, but you can never tell.”


November 22, 1916 [SBDN]: “Wireless phone for Santa Cruz Isle. New invention to give communication with mainland. Santa Cruz Island, favorite camping and picnic grounds for Santa Barbara people during the summer season and the site of the Caire sheep ranch and vineyards, will be brought into permanent communication with the mainland if negotiations started by Dr. H. Barriger Cox are successful. Dr. Cox, who is the inventor of the wireless telephone, proposes to install a station on the island, thirty miles off the coast, for the convenience and service of campers and permanent residents. The latter are employees of the ranch. The island has never been in direct communication with the mainland except when boats carrying wireless apparatus were anchored off its shores. It is to make communication as direct and permanent as though telephone wires stretched through the miles of sea that Dr. Cox plans to install the wireless station. Today he mailed a letter to representatives of the Caire family of San Francisco, owners of the island, asking permission to install his telephone booth and mechanism at or near the camp of Captain Eaton, the headquarters of the summer colony…”


December 14, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, accompanied by a half a dozen experienced fishermen with their nets, will go to the islands in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, this morning after a load of fish…”


December 14, 1916 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton and several experienced fishermen left this morning in the Sea Wolf for the islands on a fishing trip. They expect to return on Sunday.”


January 17, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton came over from the islands yesterday morning in the Sea Wolf, with a ton of rock cod—the biggest lot of fish that has come in in one load for some time past. The captain reported rigorous weather and rough water along the island shores for a week or ten days past. He returned to the other side of the channel last evening.”


January 17, 1917 [SBDN]: “The biggest lot of fish brought into Santa Barbara for some time was that of Captain Ira K. Eaton, who brought a ton of rock cod from the islands yesterday.”


January 19, 1917 [SBMP]: “In the teeth of a southeast gale, Captain Ira Eaton started out for Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf yesterday afternoon about 2:30 with a company of fifteen moving picture actors in quest of scenery and ‘locations.’ The actor folk represented the Corona Cinema Company of Los Angeles, headed by ‘Scotty’ Beale, son of Louise Hester, and formerly well known here… The strongest impelling force that the company had for starting on this voyage in a storm was the fact that several members of the same company were already at Pelican Bay, where they have been for about a week, and it was felt by the others that they must join them with new stocks of provisions.”


January 27, 1917 [SBMP]: “’Scotty’ Beale’s party of Corona Cinema players returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island in Captain Ira Eaton’s Sea Wolf, after a ten days’ professional stay. They made the out-bound trip in the face of a heavy gale, but suffered no inconvenience. The return voyage was made delightful. The party went to Los Angeles later in the day.”


February 9, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton came over from the islands in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning with 2700 pounds of rock cod. After landing his load he at once started on his return to Pelican Bay for another load of fish, expecting to return to the mainland tomorrow.”


February 21, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who came over from the islands in the Sea Wolf with a load of fish last Monday night, started away the following morning with a band of sheep shearers who are just about to start on the spring clip for Captain Waters' flock on San Miguel Island. There are about 3500 sheep there, and the work will take from three to four weeks.”


March 14, 1917 [SBMP]: “Many are waiting for island voyage. In meantime, Captain Ira Eaton is ‘on the ways’ in home port with grip. Captain Ira K. Eaton, long known to the island transportation circles and the sealing industry, has been ‘on the ways’ in his home port for the past ten days, with a severe attack of the grip, which, however, is about conquered. About the time he was obliged to take to his bed, the captain received an order for twenty seal lions for Captain George M. McGuire. He put Captain Frank Nidever aboard Sea Wolf and sent him over to the islands to hunt for the game. The substitute, is himself, a master hand at this sort of hunting, but as nothing has been heard from him in the matter, it is supposed that the rough water that has lately persisted along the island shore has made it impossible for him to get into the caves to look for his quarry. It is thought probable, however, that the water conditions will soon improve, and that it will not be long before Captain Nidever will report at the home port with at least a good installment of his order...”


March 20, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton has just been awarded by the Federal Government the lease of Anacapa Island for a term of five years beginning April 1. The last two terms, aggregating ten years, the island has been leased to Captain Bay Webster of Ventura, and he was one of the bidders for the ensuing term, but Captain Eaton's bid was higher than that of the Ventura man, and he took the prize. Captain Eaton will use the island primarily for fishing camps—the waters roundabout constituting famously good fishing grounds, better at certain seasons, than in any of the other island waters—and he will also utilize the small sheep range on the island, expecting to have a flock of about 500 of the profitable wool bearers. There are at present about 400 sheep on the range belonging to Captain Webster, and these may be bought by the new lessee, or they may not.”


March 21, 1917 [SBMP]: “The Sea Wolf leaves today for San Miguel Island this morning with a dozen sheep shearers who will commence the wool clip on the island flock, a work that will require about two weeks. In the absence of the owner of the boat, Captain Eaton, who is confined to his home by illness, the craft will be sailed by Captain Al Chase.”


March 23, 1917 [OC]: “Captain Ira Eaton has just been awarded by the federal government the lease of Anacapa Island for a term of five years, beginning April 1. For the last two terms, aggregating ten years, the island has been leased to Captain Bay Webster of Ventura, and he was one of the bidders for the ensuing term, but Captain Eaton’s bid was higher than that of the Ventura man, and he took the prize. Captain Eaton will use the island principally for fishing camps, the waters roundabout constituting famously good fishing grounds, better, at certain seasons, than in any of the other island waters, and he will also utilize to the utmost the small sheep range on the island, expecting to have a flock of about 500 of the profitable wool bearers. There are at present about 400 sheep on the range, belonging to Captain Webster, and these may be bought by the new lessee, or they may not be.”


March 26, 1917 [LAT]: “Ventura. Captain Bay Webster, who has reigned as King of Anacapa Island for ten years, was overbid for the possession of the island, the government giving the lease for the next five years to Ira Eaton of Santa Barbara. Webster has carried on the business of sheep raising there, and now has 500 in his flock. During the summer months the only way the sheep have of quenching their thirst is from eating vegetation, which accumulates quantities of moisture. Eaton is engaged in deep sea fishing, and will use the island principally for fishing camps.”


May 26, 1917 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf, bringing over 15 members of Director Sturgis' company of American Film actors who had spent five days on the island...”


May 26, 1917 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton, skipper of the Sea Wolf, returned to Santa Barbara yesterday with a company of moving picture actors from the American studios who have been spending the past five days on Santa Cruz Island taking scenes for a screen production. The rugged coastline from Valdez Cave to Pelican Bay was used in the various locations. Captain Eaton expects to take a company of 30 from the Universal Studios in Los Angeles to the island tomorrow. The diversities of scenery make the place an ideal rendezvous for the various movie companies and several different directors have made plans for visiting the place this summer.”


May 31, 1917 [SBDN]: “The third of a series of lectures on navigation was given last night at the Arlington by Commodore James H. Bull to prospective members of the Coast Patrol and other Santa Barbara residents interested in nautical affairs… Captain Ira Eaton will have charge of the crew on board Sea Wolf, it was stated, and Captain Ed Gourley will command the men assigned to the Royal. Several trips will be taken to the islands it is thought…”


June 9, 1917 [SCICO]: “Eaton tells us that he has a range at Fry's Harbor that he is going to dispose of and we thought it might perhaps do for Christy. We will go over and look at it at the first opportunity.”


June 17, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton came over from Pelican Bay yesterday afternoon accompanied by F. J. Leary, business manager of the Universal Film Company, who has a company of nearly 70 people on the island engaged on a big marine picture. The trip to the mainland was for the purpose of allowing Mr. Leary to get his headquarters on the wire for a report of progress and to give the commissary department of the island camp a replenishment. The captain and his passenger list and cargo will return to the camp this morning.”


June 18, 1917 [SBDN]: “The Universal Film Company has about 70 actors still on Santa Cruz Island, under the direction of F. J. Leary. Leary came across the channel Saturday with Captain Ira Eaton to contract for a large amount of camp supplies.”


June 28, 1917 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton sails tomorrow for the islands with an order from Captain George M. McGuire for an even dozen seals. The order comes to Captain McGuire from three of the biggest zoological gardens in the country. The seals will be brought here and shipped direct. Captain Eaton has been very successful as a catcher of seals, having in the past few years executed many similar orders for Captain McGuire, the largest seal shipper in the country.”


June 29, 1917 [SBDN]: “Yesterday 25 members of the Marine Film Company of Los Angeles were taken to Santa Cruz Island by Captain Ira Eaton on the Sea Wolf.”


July 2, 1917 [LAT]: “Island’s new king to land on domain today. For the sum of $607 a Santa Barbara skipper will be Lord of Wild Anacapa, one-time stomping ground of pirates, for the next five years. Early this morning, if the breeze is fair, Captain Ira Eaton will shake the reefs out of his sea legs, cast off shore lines from the staunch little Sea Wolf, and sail from Santa Barbara to become the uncrowned king of Anacapa Island… Simultaneously, Captain H. Bay Webster, who for ten years has been lord of Anacapa, will today get the last units of a herd of some 500 sheep loaded on a barge, and with 1400 pounds of wool as treasure trove, will depart for the mainland, to become an ordinary citizen once more… Captain Webster got Anacapa in 1907 for $26 a year, and in 1912 he secured the lease for $77 a year. This time, Captain Eaton overbid the former sovereign of Anacapa, and will assume possession today, wind and tide allowing…”


July 2, 1917 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton has succeeded in out-bidding Captain Bay Webster for the government leaase on Anacapa Island, and today took possession of the island, where, since 1907 Webster with his sheep has been sole possessor. Eaton bid $607 for the lease, which extends over a period of five years. There are 800 acres on the island, mostly rugged mountain sides and, it is said, but one spring, this flowing a brackish water which the sheep do not like. Webster had 500 sheep, and came away with some of these, and 1400 pounds of wool. Eaton bought some of the flock, and will continue to raise sheep for the wool, at the same time popularizing the island as a summer camping spot. He proposes to run the Sea Wolf as a passenger boat from Santa Barbara, Ventura and Hueneme to the island, and will erect tents for his patrons. The place is said to be interesting because of the many caves.”


July 2, 1917 [LAT]: “Island’s new king to land on domain today. For the sum of $607 a Santa Barbara skipper will be Lord of Wild Anacapa, one-time stomping ground of pirates, for the next five years. Early this morning, if the breeze is fair, Captain Ira Eaton will shake the reefs out of his sea legs, cast-off short lines from the staunch little Sea Wolf, and sail from Santa Barbara to become the uncrowned king of Anacapa Island… Simultaneously, Captain H. B. Webster , who for ten years has been lord at Anacapa, will today get the last units of a herd of some 500 sheep loaded on a barge and, with 1400 pounds of wool as treasure trove, will depart for the mainland, to become an ordinary citizen once more… Captain Webster got Anacapa in 1907 for $26 a year, and in 1912 he secured the lease for $77 a year. This time Captain Eaton overbid the former sovereign of Anacapa, and will assume possession today, wind and tide allowing. Captain Webster made the Anacapa a sheep ranch that is unusual in many respects. Captain Eaton will stick to the wool business, also, with modifications… Captain Eaton plans to erect a number of small buildings for use by fishing and camping parties and to encourage pleasure-seekers to visit his picturesque domain. On Sundays his launch, the Sea Wolf, will ply from Anacapa to Santa Barbara, Hueneme and Ventura, and take aboard parties of excursionists. Fish and mussel dinners will be served them on the island. There are excellent abalone and crawfish camps that will open in season for those who are keen for seafood. Captain Eaton has also purchased some of the best of Captain Webster’s herds, and will the pastures well-stocked, at the same time he tries to keep the picnic grounds occupied.”


July 13, 1917 [SBDNI]: “The Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton’s boat, came in this morning from San Miguel Island where she had taken a party of campers. She will return to the island tomorrow.”


July 17, 1917 [SBMP]: “Myron R. Bergen, for the past ten years well known in this city as an upholsterer, was found drowned at Pelican Bay Sunday morning, and thus far the cause is enshrouded in mystery. A week ago last Sunday Mr. Bergen went to Pelican Bay with Captain Ira Eaton in the Sea Wolf. Staying ashore during the day, at night he slept in the cabin of the boat, with men who constituted the crew, the captain sleeping ashore. Mr. Bergen went to bed Tuesday night, but the next morning he was not aboard. Captain Eaton concluded that the missing man had gone ashore during the night and walked to Fry's Harbor, as he said he would go there when Captain Eaton returned to Santa Barbara. Following the plan already made, Captain Eaton returned to the mainland Wednesday and then made the voyage to San Miguel Island, returning home Sunday. Yesterday he again went to Pelican Bay, arriving there at 1:30 P.M. On his arrival he learned from Captain George Nidever, whom he had left as a caretaker at the Pelican Bay camp, that the body had been found floating in the kelp near the boat landing the preceding morning. Captain Eaton returned at once to the mainland and notified Coroner Ruiz... Captain Eaton says that the water in which the boat lay last Tuesday night was smooth as a millpond. Mr. Bergen was very fond of water, a good swimmer and a very ardent admirer of Santa Cruz Island, which he visited frequently every summer. He was a quiet, genial man who made friends wherever he went, and his tragic end will arouse deep sympathy for his bereaved wife and daughter. He was a native of Illinois, aged 52, and his family resides at 519 East Pedregosa Street.”


July 18, 1917 [SBMP]: “That Myron R. Bergen, whose dead body was found in the water at Pelican Bay last Sunday morning by George Nidever, met his death by accidental drowning was the verdict of the jury in the coroner’s inquest held at the scene of the tragedy yesterday forenoon. Coroner Ruiz, Jacob G. Shoup and George Sanders, the last named representing L. E. Gagnier, the undertaker, went to Pelican Bay in the Sea Wolf with Captain Eaton yesterday morning for the purpose of holding this inquest and bringing home the remains. Captain C. F. Miller, owner of the schooner yacht Yankee, was at the bay, and he and two of his crew helped to fill the jury… There was no evidence adduced at the inquiry that threw any light on the way in which the deceased got into the water from the Sea Wolf, in the cabin of which he went to bed last Tuesday night, and there only remained he surmised that he had got up in the middle of the night and gone above for a walk about the deck, and that in some sort of attack he had fainted and fallen overboard. As explained in yesterday’s issue of the Press, when Mr. Bergen was found not aboard the Sea Wolf, Captain Eaton supposed he had gone ashore during the night and walked to Fry’s Harbor, as he had stated he might do…”


July 26, 1917 [SBNP]: “Captain Ira Eaton left yesterday with a large party in his powerboat, Sea Wolf for Santa Cruz Island.”


July 29, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton goes to Santa Cruz Island in the Sea Wolf again this morning to take over a party of ten people who will have a four-days’ camp at Cueva Valdez, by many thought the most beautiful spot on this island shore so famous for its beauty spots. The captain has several island parties that he will take across the channel this week, some of them to be entertained at his Pelican Bay resort, which is becoming more and more popular all the time…”


August 3, 1917 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton leaves this afternoon in the Sea Wolf for Santa Cruz Island with a party of 30 State Normal school students, who will camp on the island until Monday morning.”


August 3, 1917 [SBMP]: “This evening captain Ira K. Eaton will leave in his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, for Fry's Harbor, taking a party of 30 State Normal students who will camp at that delightful spot until next Monday morning.”


August 14, 1917 [SCICo]: “Eaton wants to buy about 200 head of old ewes at market price for broken-mouthed… Relative to the price to be paid by Eaton for broken-mouthed ewes, nothing definite was mentioned. At $9 to $10 for cut, our supposition of $4.50 to $5.per head is not far from correct, as these sheep are poor and will not weigh much over 60 pounds.”


September 2, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton leaves for Pelican Bay this morning with a party of 20 people who will camp at that beautiful harbor for a couple of weeks. The main purpose of the party is to fish for yellowtail and albacore, which are now plentiful in the island waters.”


September 15, 1917 [SBDN]: “The Ventura Post this morning publishes a story about the move of some Ventura men to circumvent a Santa Barbara man in the matter of landing boats on Santa Cruz Island. The Post says that to overcome a situation which has been brought about by a rivalry of boats transporting parties to Santa Cruz, certain Ventura men who have enjoyed trips to Santa Cruz before, and whose periodic journeys are now threatened unless they engage the boat of some Santa Barbara skipper, are planning on constructing a large house boat which would be anchored in any one of the harbors about the island and no one, not even the owners, could forbid men of the party from using ground within 40 feet of high tide. The difficulty, which has led to this situation, is of long standing. In the past, Bay Webster of this city has been taking parties to Santa Cruz. At one time Captain Eaton, who now leases Anacapa Island and the harbors of Santa Cruz, came here and took over a boatload of Venturans. Webster went to Santa Barbara and engaged his boat in similar work there. Up until recently Webster has been the successful lessee of Anacapa Island. But this year Eaton was successful in securing the lease for Anacapa and in leasing the harbors of Santa Cruz. For this latter right he paid $700 to the Caire estate, which now owns the island. As a result he can forbid the use of the land 40 feet back from the water to pleasure seekers. It is the understanding of many Venturans that the situation is one whereby certain transporters of Santa Barbara are trying to freeze out Webster. Hence the move here to locate a houseboat in Pelican Harbor or one of the other desirable locations there.”


September 18, 1917 [SBDN]: “The Sea Wolf, in charge of Captain Ira Eaton, has returned from Santa Cruz Island with members of the Alamo Club of Summerland, who spent Sunday fishing and exploring on the island.”


September 24, 1917 [SBDN]: “Kelp beds are proving veritable gold mines on Santa Cruz Island for a number of young men, according to news brought from the island by members of a big Sunday excursion, who returned last night. It was explained to the excursionists that six young fellows have discovered the potash values in kelp, and are burning the kelp on the island beach, gathering up the ashes, and extracting 45 percent potash, which it is stated, is netting them an average of $45 a day. They harvest the kelp from rowboats, dry it on the sands, and set the dry kelp heaps afire. Their activities, it is reported, have attracted interests which are now seeking to curtail their work, as an effort will be made to drive them from the island. It is stated that the kelp beds are close in shore, and more densely matted than the beds of kelp that line the channel just off Santa Barbara. As the kelp belongs to the government, and the boys are said not to have a license to harvest it, the excursionists do not believe their activities will be long continued. Among the excursionists who made the trip in the Sea Wolf with Captain Ira Eaton were Mr. and Mrs. Knapp, Mrs. O. R. Sayar, Mrs. Harry Watkins, Mr. and Mrs. Reed, Miss Yates, Sidney Lingham, Dr. H. C. Sexton, two sons of Dr. Goodrich, and several friends with Mr. De Ponce. Three whales were sighted, spouting vigorously. The excursionists made Pelican Bay, where a son of the late Senator Bard is entertaining friends.”


November 17, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton came over from Prisoners’ Harbor in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning and returned to the same island port in the afternoon with mail and supplies for the Caire ranch. The Sea Wolf is handling the transportation matters from the ranch named during the absence of Caire’s power schooner, Santa Cruz, while the latter craft is undergoing an overhauling at San Pedro. Captain Eaton will return to the mainland with his boat this morning and this evening he will take to the island a party of hunters who will scour the hills tomorrow in quest of wild geese, which are said to be plentiful there at present. The sportsmen include Lloyd Freeze, Malcolm and Allen Lougheed, W. J. Seward, William J. Wilson, Fred Low, Fred Hendricks and probably two or three others who have not yet definitely stated whether they will join the party. A company of twelve hunters who went out for game on the island last Sunday bagged 102 geese and 37 ducks.”


November 17, 1917 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton left for Santa Cruz Island this morning with a party of local men, going after wild geese. The hunters include Allen Loughead, Lloyd S. Freeze, Malcolm Loughead, W. J. Seward, William J. Seward, W. J. Wilson, Fred Hendricks and Fred Low.”


November 17, 1917 [SBDN]: “A party of goose hunters will leave tonight for Santa Cruz Island on the Sea Wolf, on which Captain Ira K. Eaton is making regular trips to and from the island now. The party includes Lloyd Freeze, Malcolm and Allan Loughead, W. J. Seaward, William J. Wilson, Fred Low, Fred Hendricks. Hunters returning from Santa Cruz Island report geese plentiful there.”


November 21, 1917 [SBMP]: “This morning Captain Ira K. Eaton leaves in the Sea Wolf for Santa Cruz Island with a party of a dozen men from Ventura for a three-days’ fishing cruise. All of the Channel Islands will be visited, and the party may extend the cruise to San Nicolas Island.”


November 21, 1917 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton left this morning in the Sea Wolf with a party of Ventura men for a three days’ fishing trip and cruise among the island. The trip will extend to San Nicolas Island, 85 miles off the coast.”


January 6, 1918 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton, who returned last Friday night in the Sea Wolf from San Pedro where he put his craft through a course of repainting and general overhauling, goes to the island this morning on a fishing trip. Coming up from the lower port, the captain towed a towboat, the Merwiss, to this port. The craft will be used at Goleta in the towing of kelp barges operating in that local city.”


January 22, 1918 [SCICo]: “[Ira] Eaton has asked for a reduction in rent. He states that the prospects for this season are very poor. Also that Vasquez deprived him of Fry's Harbor last year and is still occupying Dick's... He intimated that if Vasquez, Webster and others are allowed to bring camping parties to the island without molestation, that there was no reason for him to pay rent for a privilege used by others.”


June 8, 1918 [SBMP]: “While Friday is looked upon as a decidedly unlucky day in nautical circles, nevertheless it is fish day, and so on next Friday the Central Meat and Fish Market will be opened for business by Captain Ira K. Eaton and Charles B. Sedgwick. The location of the business will be just above the Central Hotel on State Street. It is announced that the firm will specialize in fish and it is in the position of being able to make its own catches, as Captain Eaton is well equipped for the purpose.”


June 11, 1918 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton has taken an interest in the Central Market, and extensive alterations are being made to take care of fish sales as well as of meats. Captain Eaton has started from San Pedro for the islands to catch a load to fish for the Friday’s demand, and has also made arrangements both from San Pedro and San Francisco to receive supplies of the various fish in demand here. Captain Eaton is one of the best known seamen on the coast, and for many years has had charge of vessels having Santa Barbara as their home port, and as master of the Sea Wolf he has been doing a large passenger business, as well as bringing fish. He has become widely known through his summer camp at Santa Cruz Island, and is now lessee from the government of Anacapa Island, where he has a big flock of sheep.”


July 13, 1918 [SBMP]: “’There will be no change in the management policy of Santa Cruz Island,’ says Arthur Caire of San Francisco, who is visiting in this city. ‘The island will be run as it has been for the last 20 years, purely as an industrial enterprise. With the exception of Captain Ira K. Eaton, no boating or camping privileges have been granted, as the management wishes to confine the island to the raising of cattle, sheep and to the wine industry,’ Caire declared...”


July 16, 1918 [OC]: “Dr. and Mrs. Livingston and Mrs. J. T. Donlon and party have gone to Santa Cruz Island instead of Catalina Island. They went yesterday from Santa Barbara on Captain Eaton’s launch Sea Wolf. They plan to remain about a month on the island.”


August 8, 1918 [SBDN]: “The Sea Wolf, Ira K. Eaton, captain, came into port Wednesday with 1200 pounds of fine fish, including sheepshead, white fish, rock cod and other edible varieties. Mrs. Eaton also returned on this trip, having maintained a camp for the last 10 days for a big party of Montecito people, and others. Dr. Livinsgton and his party returned with Captain Eaton from the island camp. Fishing is good, and all the campers have enjoyed the greatest kind of sport in this line. One of the sights is the flying fish, which are said to be skimming about along the island surf by hundreds, attracted by the fine feeding grounds.”


August 20, 1918 [SBDN]: “Vitagraph players to the number of twenty-five will motor up from Los Angeles this morning, and immediately proceed to Santa Cruz Island with Captain Ira Eaton. For a week they will operate from Pelican Harbor under the direction of Paul Hurst.”


September 27, 1918 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira K. Eaton returned from the islands in the Sea Wolf last evening with about two tons of fish for his Central Market, 525 State Street. The cargo included yelowtail, sea bass, rock bass, albacore and smelt. This was the largest haul made at the island fishing grounds since the recent violent disturbance of those waters began about ten days ago.”


October 2, 1918 [SBMP]: “Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Glover have returned from chaperoning a party of 20 to Santa Cruz Island. The start was made early Sunday morning in the commodious Sea Wolf… Pelican Bay was the landing place, and a garden filled with vegetables of all kinds indicated that the soil is remarkable fertile… The party enjoyed a fish dinner prepared by Captain Eaton and his men…”


January 13, 1919 [SBDN]: “Captain Ira Eaton’s launch Sea Wolf, which is being dolled up at San Pedro, will be ready for use soon, and the captain will take a trip south and bring her back to her home in the channel Waters. Captain Eaton, who is now employed by the Larco Fish market, will then use the Sea Wolf to drag net for halibut. It is rumored that he contemplates making some improvements in his camp on Santa Cruz Island for the summer trade, when the Sea Wolf plies back and forth with passengers to the islands.”


February 22, 1919 [SBMP]: “After an absence from the island more than a year, J. R. Moore, owner of San Miguel Island, arrived yesterday from Florida, and at once proceeded to cross the channel to inspect his domain. The Sea Wolf was chartered for the occasion...”


February 22, 1919 [OC]: “J. R. Moore of Boston, one of the owners of San Miguel Island, has just returned from army training, and left today on the Sea Wolf, Captain Ira K. Eaton for the island, where he expects to spend several days fishing and enjoying freedom far out on the blue Pacific. Mr. Moore bought a half interest in the island, his partner in ownership [Robert L. Brooks] being now in the service of his country.”


May 6, 1919 [SCICo]: “To Whom It May Concern: You are herewith notified that Ira K. Eaton, having rented all camping privileges at Santa Cruz Island, all persons camping or committing other acts of trespass without permission are liable to arrest and prosecution to the full extent of the law. The Santa Cruz Island Company, Superintendent.”


May 20, 1919 [SBDN]: “Carrier pigeons as a means of communication between the Channel Islands and the mainland will soon become common, as large numbers of birds are now being trained for that purpose. At present the only means of communication is by boat, the installation of a woreless system having been halted during the war by government order. Captain Ira Eaton has a flock of forty or fifty pigeons at his camp on Santa Cruz Island which are the birds that are being used. Eighteen of the young squabs are to be brought over to the mainland and trained from the Belvedere within a few weeks. It is expected that they will make the thirty mile trip across the channel easily within half an hour, so that at any time messages may be dispatched quickly. They are now being used between Pelican Bay and Valdez on the island.”


May 30, 1919 [SBMP]: “The Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton, docked at the pier yesterday morning from San Pedro. She tarried in the southern harbor long enough to have a portion of her hull repainted. She leaves this morning for Fry’s Harbor with a cargo of provisions.”


June 7, 1919 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton and a sealing crew are at the islands in the power launch Sea Wolf, their purpose being to fill an order from Captain George McGuire for eight sea lions for zoos in New York and Philadelphia. It is generally conceded that the majority of the performing seals in the world have come from Santa Barbara. Their habit is the Channel Islands, and practically all of them have been sold by Captain McGuire, who has for many years been in close touch with the trainers who make a specialty of graduating this particular class of animal talent. During the past 15 years, up to the beginning of the war, McGuire has shipped abroad and to zoos and parks in this country, an annual average of from 120 to 140 of these wonderful amphibians. For the past eight years most of these have been captured in the island coves by Eaton and his trained crew.”


June 10, 1919 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton returned with the Sea Wolf from the islands Sunday, where, with his sealing crew, he spent 10 days in an unavailing quest for sea lions, on an order from Captain George McGuire. He reported the waters in the island caves where the seals are found so tempestuous that the disappointed hunters finally sought other fields in hopes of better luck at Santa Barbara Island. The result of this, however, was still worse fortune, for here they not only failed to secure any of the game sought, but through ground swells of terrific force, two big nets, valued at $200 each, were lost. The captain is not given to dismay over disaster, however, and yesterday he and his crew returned to Santa Cruz Island with the material for replacement of the lost tackle, to resume their quest for seals.”


June 10, 1919 [SBDNI]: “Captain Ira Eaton of the Sea Wolf is mourning the loss of two valuable nets swept overboard last week while hunting seals off Santa Barbara Island. Eaton and his crew spent ten days in an unsuccessful survey of the island coves, where they went in quest of seals and sea lions to fill an order from Captain George McGuire. Weather conditions and the roughness of the water were mainly responsible for the crew’s failure and Eaton expects to return soon with new apparatus, and every hope of success.”


June 26, 1919 [SCICo]: “Arrangements have been made with Eaton to pick up the mail and other business.”


July 12, 1919 [SCICo]: “We are endeavoring to send this and a telegram over by Eaton or some fisherman.”


July 16, 1919 [SBMP]: “The launch Sea Wolf, Captain Ira K. Eaton at the helm, conducted a merry and enthusiastic party of sightseers from the Hotel Belvedere to Santa Cruz Island for an all day trip. After the cruise along the island coast and a trip into the famous Painted Cave, the visitors expressed amazement that the beauties of the romantic island were not more widely known. Among the party were tourists who have visited the wonder spots of the world, but they declared that never in their travels had they seen anything to equal the grandeur and coloring of the Painted Cave. So enamored of the scenery found there were Miss Lillian Genth and Miss A. B. Seigher, artists from the Genth Studio of New York City, that they remained at Eaton’s camp on Pelican Bay, where they expected to sketch for a couple of weeks… Sea Wolf steamed for the island at 7:30 yesterday morning, returning to the pier at 6:30 in the evening.”


July 16, 1919 [SBDNI]: “A dozen Belvedere guests yesterday visited Santa Cruz Island aboard Captain Ira Eaton’s boat, the Sea Wolf. The party toured the coast of the island and spent much time at the Painted Cave. Two of the party, Miss Lillian Genth and Miss A. B. Seigher, of the Genth Studios, New York, remained at Pelican Bay to sketch for a week.”


July 17, 1919 [SCICo]: “Capt. Ira K. Eaton, Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, Cal. Dear Sir: Under instructions from Mr. F. F. Caire, you are herewith notified that dog “Jack” must be removed from the Island at once. Respectfully yours, The Santa Cruz Island Company, Superintendent.”


July 28, 1919 [SCICo]: “Mr. Ira K. Eaton, Santa Barbara, Cal. Dear Sir: You are advised that it is not the purpose of the Company to run any but its own livestock on the Island. You are therefore requested to remove from, and not to bring any more sheep, goats etc. to the Island. By acting in accordance with this request you will oblige, The Santa Cruz Island Company, Fred. F. Caire, President.”


July 28, 1919 [SBDNI]: “Aboard Captain E. S. Eden’s boat, Barbarino, a party of nineteen visited Santa Cruz Island yesterday. The boat left the wharf about 7 o’clock Sunday morning and reached the south end of the island about 10 o’clock. From there the party cruised to Captain Eaton’s harbor where they landed for lunch and stayed until 4:30 o’clock. They returned to Santa Barbara a little after 8 o’clock.”


August 15, 1919 [CDC]: “…The [Santa Cruz] Island management has been adverse to permitting campers on the island in considerable numbers, but occasional trips are made to it by Captain Ira Eaton in his ship, the Sea Wolf, with vacation parties…”


September 7, 1919 [SBMP]: “Nature Study Club explores beauty spots of Santa Cruz Island, by C. M. Glover… The head of the Nature Club is not usually keen for the study of nature, howbeit, he became interested in submarine gardens as soon as the Sea Wolf left her mooring… The Painted Cave of fairy grotto toward the west end of Santa Cruz Island was the first stop… Rounding a rocky promontory into Pelican Bay a scene of rare beauty was set before the visitors… the yacht Caprice with white sails set tugged at her moorings, while her crew of merry makers dived from her decks… The facilities of Captain Eaton’s culinary department were talk to the utmost… ”


October 20, 1919 [SCICo]: “Mr. J. M. Sanchez, Santa Barbara, Dear Sir: Captain Vasquez informs me that he will not be back Thursday Oct 23rd for the grapes you ordered. We cannot deliver these grapes in Santa Barbara and would advise that you make arrangements with Capt Eaton of the Sea Wolf, who is now hauling grapes from the Island, to deliver them for you. Mr. Eaton will call on you. Let us know your intentions by return mail. Yours truly, Clifford McElrath, Superintendent, The Santa Cruz Island Company.”


November 4, 1919 SBDNI]: “Twenty-four wild geese were shot at Santa Cruz Island last week by Captain Ira Eaton and his assistant, Albert Newton.”


November 17, 1919 [SCICo]: “I. K. Eaton hauled Cozzani’s grapes. Cozzani sent various amounts by Eaton to pay for grapes in advance. We were unable to deliver grapes to the value of the money received and so sent it back to Cozzani by Eaton who, who gave us a receipt for same. We deemed this proper as Eaton was acting at the time as Cozzani’s agent.”


November 18, 1919 [SBMP]: “Three small buildings belonging to Captain Ira Eaton and located in Pelican Bay, Santa Cruz Island, were destroyed by fire Thursday afternoon, according to word brought over from the island yesterday. The buildings contained several hundred dollars worth of bedding and food supplies besides material used by moving picture companies. It is believed that Captain Eaton will rebuild again in the near future.”


December 28, 1919 [SCICo]: “Mr. Ira K. Eaton, Santa Barbara, Dear Sir: Enclosed you will find two copies of your account with the Santa Cruz Island Co. up to January 1st 1920. We would like to have you balance this account up as soon as possible and in the meantime will you kindly sign one of the copies noting it as correct and return same to me. Yours truly, Clifford McElrath Superintendent, The Santa Cruz Island Company, Santa Barbara.”


February 2, 1920 [SCICo]: “I. K. Eaton is at Santa Barbara but is leaving this week for San Pedro to have his own boat cleaned. On his return we can get him to make whatever trips are needed.”


February 9, 1920 [SCICo]: “I expect Eaton back from San Pedro possibly this week. What arrangements shall I make with him, what arrangements with the San Pedro people if any, etc.? I received from Eaton a signed statement acknowledging the corrections of the bill I presented him with, including rent up to January 1, 1920.”


February 16, 1920 [SCICo]: “Mr. Eaton has not yet returned from San Pedro but is expected today or tomorrow.”


March 1, 1920 [SCICo]: “Eaton tells me he will be able to make whatever trips are necessary any time we want him to do so.”


April 29, 1920 [SBMP]: “Officers make another raid on Santa Cruz. No word had been received early this morning from federal officers said to be engaged in another raid on Santa Cruz Island moonshiners early yesterday morning when a small distilling apparatus, a quantity of brandy and whiskey were confiscated, and Captain Ira K. Eaton arrested at Pelican Bay. The officers arrived from San Pedro aboard a United States submarine chaser, landed at Captain Eaton’s camp at Pelican Bay late at night, and searching the vicinity located a still and liquor. Captain Eaton was taken into custody and brought to the city jail, where he was confined last night awaiting the return of the federal officers, who, it is said, will take him to Los Angeles today to answer charges of violation of the prohibition law. The officers state that the liquor traffic has been going on from the island for several months, and claim that intoxicants have been manufactured on the island in large quantities and landed for sale on the coast north of the city. The officers engaged in the raid were Arthur Kreite, chief prohibition officer of southern California; W. E. White, chief deputy; Frank Reynolds, field deputy; and several others. Captain Eaton maintains he had nothing to do with the manufacturing or smuggling of the liquor, and states that he will easily prove it when arraigned.”


April 29, 1920 [LAT]: “Santa Barbara. April 28. Ten barrels of whisky mash and a commercial size still have been seized on Santa Cruz Island, thirty miles off coast here, by prohibition officers and the investigators are now on the island looking for more stills which they believe to be located there. Captain Ira Eaton, owner of a pleasure launch here and lessee of a resort on the island, is in jail here and will be taken to Los Angeles tomorrow morning to answer charges before the Federal Court there. The mash and still were found on Eaton’s lease. The raiding party which seized the whisky mash came here aboard a sub chaser from San Pedro, late yesterday. In the party are Arthur Klete, chief prohibition officer for the district, William White, chief deputy, Frank Reynolds, chief field deputy, E. Vance and George Coloneous, deputies, and an assistant United States District Attorney.”


April 29, 1920 [LAT]: “Islander accused. Ira Eaton, who lives on Santa Cruz Island, set up a still for the manufacture of liquor, according to a complaint filed before the United States Commissioner Long yesterday, but forgot to register it, as required by law. Eaton will be arraigned before the commissioner this morning.”


April 30, 1920 [SU]: “Moonshiners' school reported on island. Los Angeles, April 29. — A school for moonshiners is being conducted on San Nicolas Island, 75 miles off the coast of Los Angeles, according to a statement declared to have been made by Ira Eaton, arrested on Santa Cruz Island, off Santa Barbara, Tuesday, charged with operating an illicit still.”


May 2, 1920 [Bakersfield Morning Echo]: “Moonshiner school on San Nicolas Isle. Los Angeles, April 29.—A school for moonshiners is being conducted on San Nicolas Island, 75 miles off the coast of Los Angeles county, according to a statement declared to have been made by Ira Eaton, arrested on Santa Cruz Island, off Santa Barbara, Tuesday, charged with operating an illicit still.”


May 3, 1920 [SCICo]: “You have probably read in the papers about the raid that federal officers made on Eaton’s camp a week ago Sunday night. They found a still or part of one in the kitchen with the barrels of mash in a cave down by the ocean. Eaton is now out on bail. I have not seen him yet.”


May 10, 1920 [SCICo]: “Eaton is out on bail. He preliminary hearing is set for May 20th. His trouble will not affect the running of his boat.”


May 25, 1920 [SCICo]: ”Eaton has not shown up with his boat and I do not know when I will be able to get this letter off.”


March 28, 1920 [LAT]: “For a week of wild boar hunting on Santa Cruz Island four local sportsmen have chartered the forty-foot yacht Sea Wolf, and will sail from Santa Barbara Wednesday morning. The expedition will be in charge of Captain Ira K. Eaton. The boar hunters are John Edwin Hogg, Frank Sawyer, Ferdinand Gay and Philip Johnson. They will establish a camp at Willow slough inlet as a base for hunting activities in the interior of the wild rugged island. According to Captain Eaton, some of the old tuskers are large and fierce and provide the most thrilling and dangerous sport to be found anywhere within a radius of 2000 miles of Los Angeles.”


April 30, 1920 [Ogden Standard Examiner] “Los Angeles, Cal. A 'school for moonshiners' is being conducted on San Nicolas Island, 75 miles off the coast of Los Angeles county, according to a statement declared to have beeb made by Ira K. Eaton, arrested on Santa Cruz Island, off Santa Barbara, Cal., Tuesday charged with operating an illicit still.”


May 7, 1920: [CS]: “A ‘school for moonshiners’ is being conducted on San Nicolas Island, 75 miles off the coast of Los Angeles, according to a statement made by Ira Eaton, arrested on Santa Cruz Island, off Santa Barbara, Cal., charged with operating an illicit still. Eaton was brought to Los Angeles by William E. Cavanaugh, deputy United States marshal. Cavanaugh said Eaton told him of the ‘school’ and also that he knew of at least twenty stills being operated on Santa Cruz, San Miguel, Santa Rosa and Anacapa islands. The moonshiners were decalred to have learned their trade on San Nicolas Island, then set up in whiskey making on the other islands, which are populated only by a few fishermen and sheep herders.”


May 30, 1920 [SCICo]: “Eaton brought freight on Sea Wolf Wednesday, and brought additional freight and Mr. Troup Friday.”


June 22, 1920 [LAT]: “The supposed president of the ‘University of Moonshiners’ of the Channel Islands, said to supply most of the bootleggers and bootleg of this part of California, is under arrest at Santa Barbara. He is Augustine Cozzani, a Santa Barbara fisherman, who has just been taken into custody there with a magnificent assortment of joy water and liquor-making apparatus. A manufacturer of forbidden beverages who was arrested some weeks ago [Eaton] on one of the Channel Islands told the government agents that a school for liquor-making was operated on San Nicolas Island, and that the graduates were plying their trade at various insular retreats near Santa Barbara. The Channel Islands, he indicated, are heavily equipped with illicit stills…”


August 5, 1920 [SBMP]: “Launch Sea Wolf attacked by swordfish. ‘Bulldog’ of the deep gets little surprise. Swordfish are naturally vicious. They are also known as ‘bulldogs’ of the deep and when in battle they work deadly havoc with an opponent. Attacks by swordfishes on ocean-going ships are so common as to be included among sea risks. The cause which excites swordfishes to attack boats is unknown, but they follow instinct so blindly that they have become a menace to navigation in a large sense. Captain Ira K. Eaton, of the schooner Sea Wolf, related yesterday an incident wherein a swordfish collided with his craft in the channel Waters as few weeks ago. The Sea Wolf was speeding from Santa Cruz Island to the mainland when a swordfish made a dash toward a forward end of the boat and crashed head on. The little vessel faltered for but a moment and the last Captain Eaton saw of the swordfish was the flip of the tail as it disappeared well to starboard. When the captain had his boat in dry-dock recently his attention was called to a jagged hole in the keel. The specimen of planking had been pierced by the weapon of the swordfish as enclosed was the broken end of the sword 3 inches long, as if the fish had the object of concentrating its attack on the same vulnerable spot of its supposed enemy. The part of the sword which penetrated the Sea Wolf’s keel was broken off sharp and remained firmly embedded in the wood, the conclusion being advanced that the fish was unable to execute sufficient powerful backward movement to free itself by extricating the sword. The power required to produce such an effect upon a boat of the Sea Wolf’s type is described by Captain Eaton as the accumulated force of 15 double handed hammers. Instances have been cited where swordfish have driven their weapon through copper sheathing, oak-planking and timber to a depth of nearly 10 inches.”


September 8, 1920 [SBMP]: “Having braved the perils of the deep where they found fishing good, particularly for halibut, upon which a new and enticing bait was said to have been used, 34 Santa Barbarans returned late Monday from a two-day pilgrimage to Cueva Valdez Harbor, Santa Cruz Island… The party left Stearn’s Wharf early Sunday morning on the Sea Wolf, Captain Ira K. Eaton, returning to the mainland Monday evening very much impressed with their outing…”


October 7, 1921 [LAT]: “Twenty-five seals from Santa Cruz Island will be shipped to Chicago to form part of a zoological collection being gathered over the world by Mrs. Harold McCormick, who proposes, it is said, to donate the ‘zoo’ to Cook County. Captain Ira K. Eaton of the Sea Wolf will have a chance of catching the seals. He has succeeded Captain George M. McGuire in the seal shipping business here, and has his crew ready to make the McCormick catch as soon as telegraphic instructions are received from Chicago, where a retreat for them is being made ready.”


March 17, 1923 [SBMP]: “Engineers will survey island water line. Equipped with life lines, first accurate map will be made. Frank F. Flournoy, one of the referees appointed to partition Santa Cruz Island, will leave with a party of six surveyors Monday morning to make a detailed survey of the island. Mr. Flournoy, accompanied by George W. McComber and H. J. Doulton, the other referees, returned Thursday night from their initial trip. Making a complete cruise around the island in the Sea Wolf, under Captain Ira Eaton, they located nine camps for the survey to begin Monday...”


May 30, 1920 [SCICo]: “Mr. Oscar Brown, Santa Barbara, My dear Mr. Brown: While I was in Santa Barbara I told you I might find something for you to do on Santa Cruz Island. I can use you for a while at least if you would still like to come over, paying $50… If possible I would like to have you come with Captain Eaton by return trip. You don’t need any other equipment than old clothes as we supply bedding, etc. Yours truly, Clifford McElrath, Superintendent, The Santa Cruz Island Company.”


June 6, 1920 [SCICo]: “The Sea Wolf left Friday morning with the last of the lot of ewes and bucks we sold Troup… On the corrida Friday Isaac Newton’s horse fell with him. The horse was uninjured, but Newton I believe broke his collarbone. I will send him to Santa Barbara by the first boat I can get hold of… Tuesday afternoon. Eaton has not shown up yet and Newton is suffering considerably. We have been unable to find another boat.”


June 14, 1920 [SCICo]: “The Sea Wolf arrived late on the afternoon of June 14th… Troup informs me that the count was one short and showed the wharfage charge in proof, and one died on route. I know that makes two short and I will this morning ascertain whether they were wethers, ewes, etc. The one that died was a buck— I know that as Eaton brought back the carcass… I have made no terms with Eaton, taking it for granted that the regular $30 per day under which he has always worked is the price. However, I will take it up today… It is still very foggy and the vaqueros have not been able to start their corrida in Potrero Norte. I am having Eaton wait over so as to have a load of sheep and Troup at the same time.”


June 21, 1920 [SCICo]:Sea Wolf left for Santa Barbara Thurs. June 17 with 113 lambs @ 5.50 and Troup and returned 10 A.M. Sat. June 19th with news that because of wharf repairs at Santa Barbara no more sheep could be handled till Tuesday or Wed. June 22 or 23rd…. Sea Wolf left for Santa Barbara Thurs. June 17 with 113 lambs @ 5.50 and Troup and returned 10 A.M. Sat. June 19th with news that because of wharf repairs at Santa Barbara no more sheep could be handled till Tuesday or Wed. June 22 or 23rd. If possible when I sell, if I do, those ewes and bucks at the Playa, I will get the Vaquero to take them over if it comes to less than 35 cents per head, which price it amounts to with Eaton at $35 per trip and 100 sheep approximately.”


July 1, 1920 [SCICo]: “Mr. John Troup, Goleta, Dear Sir: We are bringing the sheep from the west end of the Island to the Main Ranch Sunday and Monday July 3rd and 4th. If you can come to the Island Sunday the 3rd with Capt. Eaton prepared to stay till Tuesday morning you can look them over…”


July 5, 1920 [SCICo]: “I received information indirectly from Eaton this morning that Dapelo had died at the St. Francis Hospital.”


August 30, 1920 [SCICo]: “… I realize that Christy is a dangerous place to load but Eaton has a heavy lighter that we could use more safely than a skiff.”


September13, 1920 [SCICo]: “… Movies. Received enclosed letter from movie people. I am enclosing the agreement signed by their representative with corrections made at the time of signing. Eaton also complains of the price and says it has prevented his getting a number of companies to come to Pelican Bay.”


September13, 1920 [SCICo]: “Mr. Ira K. Eaton, Santa Barbara, Dear Sir: This is to inform you that the San Francisco office has instructed me to increase the rent of location privileges to moving picture companies to $150 per week paid in advance. Yours truly, Clifford McElrath, Superintendent, The Santa Cruz Island Company.”


February 8, 1923 [SBMP]: “A corral is being constructed on Stearn’s Wharf in order to handle the sheep brought over each year from Santa Cruz Island on the Sea Wolf for market purposes, according to Captain Ira Eaton. Captain Eaton’s boat is now in San Pedro, repairs having not yet been finished. The boat is being lengthened 11 feet and painted throughout.”


September 21, 1923 [SBMP]: “Sea Wolf skipper clears fortune. Captain Eaton expects to clear $20,000 from Cuba salvage. Loaded to the gunwales with salvage of all kinds, the launch Sea Wolf, Captain Ira Eaton, returned yesterday from the scene of the wreck of the Pacific Mail liner Cuba, on the northern end of San Miguel Island. Captain Eaton spent several days at the scene of the disaster, taking off all saleable articles, following the admission of the Pacific Mail Company that no attempt would be made to salvage the contents of the steamer. The powerboat, Marcella, of Los Angeles, has been at the scene of the wreck for the past week, and daily brings salvage to Stearn’s Wharf, where it is sold for whatever it will bring. The radio outfit of the Cuba was brought to Santa Barbara Wednesday, and was still unsold yesterday. Several amateur adventurers are thinking of chartering a boat to save a bit of the cargo of the coffee that is still intact in the hold of the vessel.”


October 19, 1923 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton of the Sea Wolf is expected to return to Santa Barbara today with 10 seals from Santa Cruz Island. An order was received Wednesday from an eastern firm, according to Harry Greenwood, and Captain Eaton left immediately to fill the order. Upon is return here he will take on a crew to work on the wreck of the steamer Cuba on the north end of San Miguel Island, leaving some time this evening.”


September 24, 1924 [SBMP]: “Among the many residents of Santa Barbara and Montecito who have been enjoying cruising in the channel and visiting the islands these balmy days of Indian summer are Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Armstrong, Mr. and Mrs. John Miller, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. John Callory and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hall, who recently returned from a week’s outing at Captain Ira Eaton’s camp at Pelican Bay.”


October 15, 1924 [SBMP]: “Director Chester Bennett and a cast of 100 members of the Famous Players-Lasky company, will sail for Santa Cruz Island next Saturday to film a large portion of Peter Pan, Sir James Barrie’s stage play, it was learned yesterday. In the place of Maude Adams, who made the play one of the best known on the stage a decade ago, 17-year-old Betty Bronson, a new star in the moving pictures, will play the title rols. Santa Cruz Island was selected as the location for the picture after a long search because of its unusual settings and unsurpassed scenery. The company will make its headquarters at Eaton’s Camp, Pelican Bay, during the filming of the picture.”


February 28, 1925 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton of the Sea Wolf left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday to trap 40 seals to fill orders received by George M. McGuire. According to Mr. McGuire, a telegraphic order for 35 seals, one of the largest ever received, came to him yesterday and Captain Eaton was immediately dispatched to the island. The seal trapping season is just opening in Santa Barbara from where most of the trained animals in captivity are secured. Captain Eaton will endeavor to bring in the entire 40 in one load which will be a record capture if he is successful.”


April 4, 1926 [SBMP]: “Captain Ramon Vasquez, one of the founders of the Santa Barbara island seal trade that has grown during his lifetime to the proportions of an industry, died in the family home at 623 East Haley Street yesterday afternoon at the age of [85] years... He was the first man in Santa Barbara to offer seals in the city for sale. He followed this trade for many years. He was succeeded as a trapper by Captain Ira Eaton. The latter now captures practically all the seals taken from the islands, and they are marketed by Captain George M. McGuire, former city councilman who controls the industry.”


June 18, 1927 [SBMP]: “Members of the Santa Barbara Yacht Club will leave this afternoon on the annual cruise to Santa Cruz Island. They will spend the night in the tent city on the island and return tomorrow afternoon. Captain Ira Eaton’s Sea Wolf will be the flagship of the cruise and will take many of the members across the channel. Several other boats also will make the trip. An interesting program is being arranged by Bob Cornwall, secretary of the club, and who is in charge of the arrangements.”


January 3, 1928 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton yesterday succeeded in raising the sunken hull of his powerboat, the Sea Wolf, which went down during the Christmas day storm, and salvaged one of the two diesel engines, each of which is valued at $4000. He declared last night that he expects to remove the other engine today, after which the hull probably will float, and will be inspected to determine whether it can be repaired. The hull was raised after a diver had descended to the ocean floor and placed a line on it, and two fishing boats had used the combined power of their winches to pull it to the surface. Before both engines could be salvaged the line slipped off and the hull sank back out of sight again. It probably will be brought to the surface again this morning. The Sea Wolf was sunk after it had dragged its anchor and had been blown against the eastern side of Stearn’s Wharf where it pounded against the wharf. The boat was valued at $15,000 by Captain Eaton, and carried no insurance. It was used for trips to Santa Cruz Island.”


January 4, 1928 [SBMP]: “With the aid of the powerful derrick barge used in the construction of the breakwater, Captain Ira Eaton’s powerboat, the Sea Wolf, was raised from the bottom of the ocean and placed on Stearn’s Wharf yesterday morning. Captain Eaton and his men began removing the diesel engine with which it was powered and which will be overhauled and put in running order again. The hull of the craft was badly battered where it had pounded against the wharf during the Christmas day storm, and it is probable that no attempt to repair it will be made. The superstructure was entirely missing, only a portion of the bottom remaining. The diesel engine salvaged by Captain Eaton is valued at $4000.”


July 2, 1928 [SBMP]: “Ten seals, trapped on Santa Cruz Island by Ira K. Eaton, were delivered to Captain George M. McGuire yesterday. Six of them will be sent to New Orleans to be placed in a new $100,000 pool, recently completed. The others have various destinations. Captain McGuire said that the weather had been so windy recently that it was difficult to trap the seals on the island.”


November 18, 1928 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton has been in charge of the Santa Cruz Island boat, Santa Cruz, for the past week due to illness of Captain Joe Bermudez.”


May 29, 1928 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton, whose powerboat Sea Wolf was wrecked during the Christmas day storm, is constructing a new boat which will be completed next month.”


July 14, 1929 [SBMP]: “The annual trip to Santa Cruz Island sponsored by the State College as part of its summer program, will be held next weekend. The party, consisting of students and their friends, will leave Stearn’s Wharf Friday afternoon aboard Captain Ira Eaton’s Sea Wolf, to return Sunday evening. The boat ride is approximately one and a half hours betwee mainland and Valdez Harbor, where camp is expected to be established. The collegians will camp out, taking their blankets and cooking utensils. Saturday morning the party will leave for an all day cruise around the island, stops being made at to visit the painted caves, the attractive coves and harbors of the island. Luncheon will be on the seaward side of Santa Cruz, where the beaches and bathing are excellent. The College Outing Club has charge of arrangements for the trip, and details may be obtained from the book store, located on the campus. Dora Woods, Ted Marshall and Fred Imes are organizing the outing.”


July 17, 1929 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton advised Harbor Master George W. Gourley yesterday that he would arrive in Santa Barbara harbor tomorrow from San Pedro, in a new powerboat, equipped with three powerful engines. The boat will be placed in service on the Santa Cruz Island run and, Captain Eaton said, will make the 30-mile trip to the islands in 90 minutes.


October 15, 1930 [SBMP]: “The grape crop on Santa Cruz Island this year was heavy, according to Captain Ira Eaton. The grapes are practically all harvested.”


October 16, 1930 [SBMP]: “With 180 tons of grapes already unloaded in Santa Barbara from the Caire Ranch, the schooner Santa Cruz this morning will head for Santa Cruz Island to take on its seventh and final grape cargo of the year. The 30 tons of grapes to be brought here on the return trip will make a total of approximately 210 tons for the season, said by Captain Ira Eaton of the Santa Cruz, to be one of the largest annual shipments ever taken from the Caire Ranch.”


August 30, 1931 [SBNP]: “Hunters, fishermen exhibit record specimens of game. Several prize specimens of fish or game animals were caught or killed by Santa Barbarans yesterday. Captain Ira K. Eaton and his dog Tammy, a wire-haired, brought in the biggest wild boar killed this season on Santa Cruz Island. The boar weighed between 250 and 300 pounds. The dog, a kind of pocket size compared with the huge boar, caught him by the ear and held him until Captain Eaton came up and shot him…”


August 14, 1938 [SBNP]: “Captain Ira Eaton, veteran mariner of the Santa Barbara channel and a resident of Santa Barbara for 53 years, died yesterday in a local hospital to which he was taken two weeks ago for a stomach operation. Members of the Santa Barbara aerie of Eagles, of which he was a charter member, joining in 1903, gave their blood last week to assist their lodge brother, but the transfusions failed to rally the sea captain. Thirty-five years ago Captain Eaton, in partnership with Captain George McGuire,who lives at 1401 De la Vina Street, began the sailing of Santa Barbara channel in connection with many activities. They became most famous for catching live seals and shipping them to all parts of the world. For many years most of the seals that amused the public in parks and circuses were caught by Captain Eaton off Santa Cruz Island. Successively Captain Eaton sailed the Gussie M, the Sea Wolf and the Pelican, which he owned and was operating at the time of his death. More than 30 years ago Captain and Mrs. Eaton established Eaton’s camp at Pelican Bay on Santa Cruz Island, and until three or four years ago it was the only public camp on the island and known to the greater part of Santa Barbara’s older residents. Funeral services will be held at 10 o’clock Tuesday morning in Haider’s chapel with the Santa Barbara Eagles in charge. Captain Eaton is survived by his wife, Mrs. Margaret Eaton; his daughter, Mrs. Very Eaton Gibbons, and two sisters, Mrs. Lillian Couch (1885-1973) of Santa Barbara and Mrs. Mabel Long of Los Angeles, all of whom were in Santa Barbara during the latter days of the captain’s illness.”


August 15, 1938 [LAT]: “Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday morning for Captain Ira Eaton, 53-year-old mariner of Santa Barbara, who died yesterday following an operation. He was one of the founders of the Santa Barbara Aerie of Eagles, and members gave freely of their blood last week in transfusions. Thirty-five years ago, in partnership with Captain George McGuire, he began the capture of Santa Cruz Island seals, taking the animals alive and disposing of them to circuses and zoos all over the world. Eaton skippered the Gussie M, the Sea Wolf and the Pelican, which he was operating at the time of his death. He had participated in several rescues of crews from flaming vessels. The captain established a camp at Pelican Bay on Santa Cruz Island, which until four years ago was a rendezvous for sportsmen and vacationists. He leaves a widow, a daughter, Mrs. Vera Eaton Gibbons; two sisters, Mrs. Mabel Long Los Angeles, and Mrs. Lillian Couch, Santa Barbara.”


December 27, 1938 [LAT]: “Santa Barbara. Santa Cruz Island seals sent by train to New York. Shipment of six males will undergo training before exhibition debut. Six husky male sea lions from the rookeries of Santa Cruz Island of the Channel Islands chain are headed out of this port, with the New York World’s Fair as their ultimate destination. Captured by Captain George McGuire, who has been hunting seals, sea lions, otters and other sea-going animals out of this port for 36 of his 85 years, the noisy cargo made the voyage from the island aboard Pelican, formerly owned by the late Captain Ira Eaton…”